Social Studies

One of the stated objectives of education is to produce good citizens. In a democracy, this means informed, involved citizens, persons who are willing and able to understand and act upon the critical issues of their times. The Social Studies are replete with controversy: questions of power, decision-making, leadership, duties of citizens, goals for the nation, freedoms for individuals, equity of opportunity, distribution of wealth, war and peace; these are issues that must be studied in their historical context, re-examined, and acted upon by each new generation of Americans. Divisions of opinion are inevitable but an informed, involved, critical thinker is better able to pursue their task of citizenship.

All Academy students are required to successfully complete Freshman Humanities, World Civilizations Post-1500, and United States History. These courses must be taken sequentially and elective courses may also be inserted into a student’s curriculum. AP European History and AP World History may be substituted for World Civilizations Post-1500 and AP United States History may be substituted for United States History.

Acceptance into AP courses requires the recommendation of the department.

Core Courses

World Civilizations, Post-1500 (Basic)
1 Credit (2911)
Prerequisite:Freshman Humanities
This course will explore the major themes of historical change in the world from 1500 to the 1800. Citizenship, government, and revolution will be primary themes of the course. It will also enable students to work on those Social Studies department standards that have not yet been mastered.

World Civilizations, Post-1500 (Standard)
1 Credit (2913)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities
This course will explore the major themes of historical change in the world from 1500 to 1800. Citizenship, government, and revolution are key strands of the course. It will also enable students to work on those Social Studies department standards that have not yet been mastered.

World Civilizations, Post-1500 (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2915)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities
In this course students will study the effect of social, political, economic, and religious change on the world in transition, spanning the era from 1500 to 1800. Government, citizenship, and revolution are major themes of the course. It will also enable students to work on those Social Studies department standards that have not yet been mastered.

AP World History
1 ½ Credit (2916/2917)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination. This course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students will investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods while they develop essential historical thinking skills. The course focuses on five interconnected themes, encouraging students to make connections between different eras in regions, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. This course fulfills the World Civilizations, Post-1500 requirement.

AP European History
1 ½ Credits (2918/2919)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in European History. This course includes a profound study of European history beginning with the late Middle Ages and continuing through the Cold War, including a demanding reading schedule and the practice of AP testing elements. This course meets for the entire year. The class will be held every other day in the first semester, and will meet every day in the second semester. This course fulfills the World Civilization Post-1500 requirement.

United States History (Basic)
1 Credit (2151)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities; World Civilizations Post-1500; Juniors
This survey course will expose students to the history of the United States in a chronological approach from the founding of the United States to the present. The course will focus on active citizenship and will highlight the study of United States history through political and economic lenses.

United States History (Standard)
1 Credit (2153)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities; World Civilizations Post-1500; Juniors
This challenging survey course focuses on the political, economic, and social changes and developments throughout the history of the United States since its founding. The course will emphasize thinking critically about cause and effect and understanding the forces that promote continuity and cause change.

United States History (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2155)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities; World Civilizations Post-1500; Juniors
This rigorous survey course focuses on the political, economic, and social changes and developments throughout the history of the United States since its founding. The course will emphasize thinking critically about cause and effect and understanding the forces that promote continuity and cause change.

AP United States History
1 ½ Credits (2158/2159)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities; World Civilization Post-1500; or AP European History; Juniors; or with department recommendation
This college-level course is taught to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement United States History exam and requires a level of critical thinking and writing commensurate with college work. This course meets for the entire year. The class will be held every other day in the first semester, and will meet every day in the second semester.

Elective Courses

Vermont History and the Identity of the Northeast Kingdom
1 CREDIT (2920)
Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed Humanities.
If history focuses on understanding our place in the world, then history starts in our own backyard. Vermont and the Northeast Kingdom share a long and storied history. Students will learn local history from primary sources, and the award-winning book, Hands on the Land, which will serve as a supplementary text. Students will participate in a variety of learning experiences including: field trips, investigation of primary sources, and self-directed research projects. Students will become historians of their home ground.

AP World History
1 ½ Credit (2916/2917)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities or with department recommendation
The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students will investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods while they develop essential historical thinking skills. The course focuses on five interconnected themes, encouraging students to make connections between different eras in regions, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.This course fulfills the World Civilizations, Post-1500 requirement.

AP European History
1 ½ Credits (2918/2919)
Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in European History. This course includes a profound study of European history beginning with the late Middle Ages and continuing through the Cold War, including a demanding reading schedule and the practice of AP testing elements. This course meets for the entire year. The class will meet every other day in the first semester, and every day in the second semester.This course fulfills the World Civilization Post-1500 requirement.

AP United States History
1 ½ Credits (2158/2159)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities; World Civilization Post-1500; or AP European History; Juniors; or with department recommendation
This college-level course is taught to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement United States History exam and requires a level of critical thinking and writing commensurate with college work. This course meets for the entire year. The class will be held every other day in the first semester, and will meet every day in the second semester.

Economics and Public Policy (Standard)
1 Credit (2947)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion or current enrollment in U.S. History and Algebra II or with department recommendation
This course is meant for students who have an interest in economics, public policy, and finance. Students will explore the fundamental principles of economics with an emphasis on practical applications through behavioral economics and game theory.Students will examine the social and economic impacts of government policy through case studies from various administrations from the 1960s to the present. Students will also design and execute behavioral economics experiments, explore personal finance strategies, and write policy papers.

Economics and Public Policy (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2948)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion or current enrollment in U.S. History and Algebra II or with department recommendation
This course is meant for students who have an interest in economics, public policy, and finance. Students will explore the fundamental principles of economics with an emphasis on practical applications through behavioral economics and game theory.Students will examine the social and economic impacts of government policy through case studies from various administrations from the 1960s to the present. Students will also design and execute behavioral economics experiments, explore personal finance strategies, and write policy papers.

AP United States Government and Politics
1 ½ Credits (2178/2179)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities, United States History; Seniors or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for roles as community leaders and responsible, active citizens using the competitive “We the People…” program, in order to strengthen their critical thinking and extemporaneous speaking skills. The “We the People…” program culminates in a State congressional hearing competition in January. Additionally, students investigate core concepts of political science: consuming and producing polls, analyzing charts and graphs, predicting voting behavior, analyzing demographic data, and understanding the essential ideas about political parties, campaigns, and elections.

Furthermore, by the end of the course, students will understand influences on the policy agenda and the process of policy making and enactment. The course will close with a study of economic naturalism. The class will meet every other day in the first semester, and every day in the second semester.

AP Microeconomics
1 ½ Credits (2218/2219)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities, United States History; Seniors or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Microeconomics. Students will investigate the core concepts of microeconomics. To meet the requirements of the Social Studies Department, students will also examine the core concepts of the United States government. Students may also elect to sit for the Advanced Placement exam in Macroeconomics with approval from the Social Studies Department Chair. Additional out of class work will be required to prepare for the Macroeconomic Exam. This class will meet every other day in the first semester, and every day during the second semester.

Modern East Asia (Standard)
1 Credit (2922)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities and World Culture since 1500 or with department
recommendation
This course will examine the rich and complex history of East Asia, particularly the modern nations of China, Japan, and Korea and will focus on the post-1945 period. The growth of China into a world leader; the dynamism of Japanese culture; the ongoing struggle between the north and the south in Korea will be explored. The course will take the form of a seminar, in which students will be expected to actively engage with course content in classroom discussion, as well as out of the classroom in writing.

Psychology (Standard)
1 Credit (2923)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities;
must be at least a Sophomore
Students will gain a knowledge of the basic theories of human behavior and interaction through readings, discussion, multimedia, and field research.

Psychology (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2925)
Prerequisites: Freshman Humanities;
must be at least a Sophomore
Students will gain a knowledge of the basic theories of human behavior and interaction through challenging readings, discussion that requires a higher level of critical thinking, multimedia, and rigorous field research.

AP Psychology
1½ Credit (2928/2929)
Prerequisite: Must be at least a Junior; no prior psychology course is required or with department recommendation
This college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Psychology and includes an in-depth study of the biological, cognitive, developmental, social, and clinical aspects of psychology. This class will meet every day in the first semester and every other day in the second semester.

Contemporary Issues (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2945)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities
This course focuses on the study of issues that are affecting the world today and requires the use of newspapers and discussion to enhance knowledge of current events.

Philosophy (Accelerated)
1 Credit (2935)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities
This course will introduce students to the study and uses of philosophy, as well as the history of ideas. Students take a multi-cultural approach by reading original works of thinkers of all regions and periods, from Plato to Rumi, Axial Age China to modern day England, and beyond. They examine issues such as free will, justice, religion, individual responsibility, and the quest to find meaning and fulfillment in the living of one’s own life.