English

The English Department recognizes a double responsibility to its students. On the one hand, students need to master specific skills essential to the proper use of language. On the other hand, students growing quickly into adulthood need to know how to write, how to read, how to create, and how to be critical thinkers in a world that demands increasingly complex choices. These latter chores are not properly called skills. Rather, they are talents whose developments are interconnected, often simultaneous, and never completed in a lifetime. The English curriculum is designed to help students continue to improve their language skills and further expand their developing talents.

Students are required to complete one non-elective, core English course each year.

Core Courses

Studies in Literary Perspectives (Basic)
1 Credit (1031)
This inquiry-based course is an introductory study of literary perspectives. It is designed to develop skills in reading, analysis, and research. Students will identify main ideas and arguments in texts; recognize ways in which writers develop these ideas through characterization, plot, structure, and other literary devices and strategies; reflect on the effectiveness of literary arguments; and consider how context and occasion influence authorial decisions and literary works.

Students will also explore their own perspectives and communicate via written, oral, and visual mediums, both independently and collaboratively, and synthesize a variety of genres and texts.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate a variety of texts and have the ability to communicate ideas, using a variety of methods, supported by evidence.

Studies in Literary Perspectives (Standard)
1 Credit (1033)
This course emphasizes the importance of inquiry while supporting skills in reading, analysis, and research. Students will identify main ideas and arguments in texts; identify ways in which writers develop these ideas through characterization, plot, structure,

and other literary devices and strategies; reflect on the effectiveness of literary arguments; and consider how context and occasion influence authorial decisions and literary works.

Students will also be required to develop their own perspectives and communicate via written, oral, and visual mediums, both independently and collaboratively, and synthesize a variety of genres and texts.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate a variety of texts and have the ability to communicate ideas, using a variety of methods, supported by evidence.

Studies in Literary Perspectives (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1035)
This accelerated course emphasizes the importance of inquiry while supporting and enriching skills in reading, analysis, and research. Specifically, the course will challenge students to identify main ideas and arguments in texts; identify ways in which writers develop these ideas through characterization, plot, structure, and other literary devices and strategies; reflect on the effectiveness of literary arguments; and consider how context and occasion influence authorial decisions and literary works.

Students will also be required to develop their own perspectives and communicate via written, oral, and visual mediums, both independently and collaboratively, and synthesize a variety of genres and texts.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate a variety of texts and have the ability to communicate complex ideas, using a variety of methods, supported by evidence.

AP Seminar
1 ½ Credits (1060/1064)
Prerequisites: Sophomores with department recommendation; Juniors with department recommendation
In the first year of the two-year sequence, students will develop and strengthen their analytic and inquiry skills, exploring in detail three to five relevant issues selected by the instructor.They will learn to consider an issue from multiple perspectives, evaluate the strength of an argument, and make logical, fact-based decisions.

During the course, students will complete a team project and presentation, an individual reflection, and an individual paper and presentation.Students are required to take the AP Seminar written exam.

Technical Communications I (Standard)
1 Credit (1063)
This standard level course is open to juniors who are enrolled in a technical education course and who anticipate continuing their education at a technical college or institute. Students will be introduced to the principles of effective communication in the workplace. Special attention will be given to workplace ethics. Students will research topics of personal and vocational interest, explore career plans and opportunities, and present information and opinions to various audiences. In class projects, students will solve realistic problems using critical thinking and decision-making skills.

Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Standard)
1 Credit (1053)
Through this course, students immerse themselves in argumentative and persuasive writing. They will then refine academic writing and research skills through the Area of Inquiry research project. Thematic units provide a platform for critical thinking about American ideals and individual

self-understanding.

Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1055)
Through this accelerated course, students immerse themselves in argumentative and persuasive writing. They will then refine academic writing and research skills through the Area of Inquiry research project. Thematic units provide a platform for critical thinking about American ideals and individual self-understanding.

AP English Language and Composition
1 ½ Credits (1058/1059)

Prerequisites: Juniors with department recommendation; concurrent enrollment with AP Seminar

This two-semester course leads directly to the taking of the Advanced Placement examination in English Language and Composition in the spring. The course introduces and reinforces skills that will allow students to do well on the AP exam, including critical reading, rhetorical and stylistic analysis, and argumentation. Students will refine their academic writing and research skills through the Area of Inquiry research project. The class process will feature seminar discussions of the assigned readings. Although primarily a study of nonfiction texts, the course will supplement its core readings with poetry and fiction drawn from the major periods of American literature.

Technical Communications II (Standard)
1 Credit (1083)

Prerequisite: Technical Communications I or with department recommendation
This standard level course is open to students who are enrolled in a minimum of two blocks of Technical Education and who anticipate continuing their education at a technical college or institute. Students will research topics of personal and vocational interest, explore career plans and opportunities, and present information and opinions to various audiences. In class projects, students will solve realistic problems using critical thinking and decision-making skills.

Studies in Literature and Composition (Standard)
1 Credit (1073)
This course teaches college-preparatory logic and analysis through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course examines significant works of world literature that reveal the diversity of human experience and the mandate to make the world a more humane place. Students write a variety of essays that build upon modes introduced in Studies in Rhetoric and Composition.

Studies in Literature and Composition (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1075)
This accelerated course teaches college-preparatory logic and analysis through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course examines significant works of world literature that reveal the diversity of human experience and the mandate to make the world a more humane place. Students write a variety of essays that build upon modes introduced in Studies in Rhetoric and Composition.

AP English Literature and Composition
1 Credit (1078)
Prerequisites: Seniors with department recommendation; concurrent enrollment with
AP Research
This two-semester course leads directly to the taking of the Advanced Placement examination in English Literature and Composition in the spring. The course introduces and reinforces skills that will allow students to do well on the AP exam. It engages students in a wealth of literature and a range of genres, reading both widely and deeply; students also write critical analysis, including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Students will refine college-level critical skills through the interpretation of prose, poetry, and drama, with a focus on British literature. The Senior Capstone experience required for graduation is also embedded in the course.

AP Research
1 Credit (1061)

Prerequisite: AP Seminar; Seniors with department recommendation; concurrent enrollment with Accelerated English Literature and Composition or AP English Literature and Composition
Students will work on an independent research project on a topic of interest.At the end of the research project, they will submit an academic paper of about 5,000 words and defend their research through a presentation.Additionally, students will present the application of their research at our spring Capstone day.

Elective Courses

Media Studies and Production I (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1005)
Prerequisite: Freshman Humanities
Media Studies and Production I examines the intricacies of journalism’s new frontier and explores what it means to allow words, images, and sound to interplay for effective communication with an audience – both the Academy community and the world at large. Students will explore the interplay of various means of communication and compose audio and video podcasts, visual narratives, and written articles. They will ultimately create multi-layered media projects through the use of multimedia authoring software for online publication and digital storytelling. Students will investigate 21st Century media to evaluate how messages are delivered with lasting impact and effectiveness.

Media Studies and Production II (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1006)
Prerequisite: Media Studies and Production I (Accelerated)
Media Studies and Production II further examines the intricacies of journalism’s new frontier and the ways in which words, images, and sound interplay for effective communication with an audience—both the Academy community and the world at large. Students will continue their exploration of various means of communication and compose nuanced audio and video podcasts, visual narratives, and written articles for publication. Additionally, students will learn and practice the mechanical, decision-making, interpersonal, and supervisory skills required to successfully manage a professional newsroom.

Creative Writing (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1007)
Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors with department recommendation
Students will create portfolios of their own work in the genres of short fiction, poetry, and playwriting; the portfolio will contain selections from their daily writing journal as well as finished and revised pieces. Students will read widely in these genres from selections of both older and contemporary works chosen by the class, and achieve a sophisticated understanding of the fundamental elements of those genres. The course will include field trips to Burlington for writing festivals and poetry slams as well as trips to local colleges for readings.

Advanced Creative Writing (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1008)
Prerequisite: Open to Seniors with department recommendation
Seniors who wish to pursue intensive study of creative writing may take Creative Writing a second time for credit. In consultation with the instructor, the student in this course will embark on a demanding course of study in two genres of his/her choice, one per quarter. These may include poetry, short fiction, script writing, the novella, and children’s literature. Students taking Advanced Creative Writing will have class with Creative Writing students. Admission will be reserved for those students who have demonstrated a sincere, significant interest in pursuing creative excellence and whose post-secondary plans include creative writing study.

Public Speaking (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1001)
Prerequisite: Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
This course enables students to speak and write effectively for a wide variety of purposes and audiences.Through the study of form and communication, students learn to use storytelling, personal statements, persuasion and vocal techniques to express their ideas at formal, informal and social events.Students will leave this class able to speak confidently and comfortably in front of almost any audience from a class to a business meeting.

College Writing (Standard)
1 Credit (1003)
Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors with department recommendation
This course is designed to improve the language and writing skills of college bound students. The course will examine strategies for writing effective college admissions essays and will study the SAT with a particular emphasis on vocabulary, timed-writing, and reading comprehension.

College Writing (Accelerated)
1 Credit (1004)
Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors with department recommendation

This accelerated course is designed to enhance the language and writing of skilled college bound students. The course will examine strategies for writing effective college admissions essays and will study the SAT with a particular emphasis on vocabulary, timed-writing, and reading comprehension.