Career and Technical Education

The St. Johnsbury Academy Department of Career and Technical Education prepares students for both post-secondary education and the world of work. We provide educational opportunities covering industry-specific skill training and credentialing, general employability skills, academic and career skill integration, and personal enrichment to students from high schools across the region. Our students are prepared for current and future educational and workplace opportunities through hands-on learning, authentic workplace experiences, and classroom instruction.

Courses are offered in the following career clusters:

  • Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
  • Architecture/Construction
  • Business and Management
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Human Services
  • Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (TDL)

These courses provide important benefits to students including career awareness and exploration, applied learning of academic skills, and an array of other outcomes, such as positive habits of mind, strong thinking skills, and the opportunity to learn about oneself and others. Some of these courses also provide in-depth knowledge and experience in a specific career field. Many courses may be taken without prerequisites.

Career Awareness

Career Exploration
1 Credit (6010)/1 Semester
Prerequisite: None
Career Exploration is designed to teach students how to engage in the career-planning process, focusing on the exploration phase. Students will be involved in hands-on activities across the Career and Technical Education’s 16 career clusters to better understand themselves and how they may intersect with the world of work after college or immediately after high school. Students will partake in demonstrations, shadow different classes, and complete self-assessments to explore careers by utilizing an online navigation program and a Career Choices curriculum. They will document their learning and career plans by developing a career portfolio.

Internship (Standard)
1 Credit (6011/6012)
1 Block/1 or 2 Semesters
2 Credits (6013/6014)
2 Blocks/1 or 2 Semesters
Prerequisite: None
Internship is a unique plan of education, integrating classroom study with planned and supervised work experience. It is a partnership between St. Johnsbury Academy and community employers that allows students to participate in related career awareness and work-experience programs. These services combine practical applications in the classroom with skills useful in the workplace and for future employment. Students have the opportunity to gain career experience, develop self-confidence, acquire necessary workplace readiness skills, and in some cases, earn a wage.

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Introduction to Natural Resources Management (Standard)
1 Credit (6100) 1 Block/1 Semester

This course is designed to be an introductory course for the Natural Resources cluster, which includes Forestry.Introduction to Natural Resources Management will emphasize the importance of inquiry and community while supporting and enriching skills in data collection, documentation, and presentation within the context of the natural resources owned and operated by St. Johnsbury Academy.Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use Microsoft Excel to collect, organize, and interpret data in the context of real-life management plans.

Forest Resources and Land Management I (Standard)
2 Credits (6101) 2 Blocks/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
This field-based course explores the ecological, economic, and social connections between timber, wildlife, soil, and water resources. In the process students will learn essential natural resource skills, such as tree identification, forest inventory, land- management planning, and timber harvesting. Students will also have multiple opportunities to interact with professionals who work to utilize and protect such resources.

Forest Resources and Land Management II (Standard)
2 Credits (6102) 2 Blocks/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
The second level of Forest Resources and Land Management is recommended for students considering post-secondary studies and/or careers in natural resources. Students will spend a majority of their time in the field studying the principles and methods of timber cruising, management planning, and harvest operations.

Students will be provided opportunities for hands-on instruction in the fundamentals of road layout, design, and constructions; tree felling, limbing, and bucking; sawmilling; firewood processing; maple-syrup production; and value-added marketing.

Architecture/Construction

Bridges, housing, water, sewer, and power distribution systems are just a few examples of human-made structures and systems connected with our natural environment. All must be designed, engineered, and constructed by people with the goals of sustainability and long-term durability as driving forces. Students may take one block, one-semester courses in three areas as an introduction to these structures and this system development.

  • Woodworking
  • Introduction to Design & Drafting
  • Introduction to Electricity

Those students who would like to pursue a career in architecture, mechanical engineering, carpentry, electricity, general contracting, environmental engineering, and green-career fields should take Sustainable Buildings/Construction I or Residential/Industrial Electricity I in their junior year. Senior students would then concentrate in topics centered on:

  • Construction: Sustainable Buildings/Construction II
  • Architecture: Design & Drafting
  • Electricity: Residential/Industrial Electricity II

At this level, students learn to design and produce an industry-related project that will emphasize the role of “green” technologies, sustainable practices, and environmentally friendly materials.

Introduction to Woodworking (Standard)
1 Credit (6200) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
In this introductory course, students will learn workplace safety by demonstrating the proper use of hand and power tools, safely operating powered machinery, and understanding OSHA standards for small shops.Students will explore project planning, basic design, wood selection, joinery and finishing techniques. This course is project oriented and students are responsible for the purchase of materials for personal projects.

Advanced Woodworking (Standard)
1 Credit (6201) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
Students will learn more advanced skills in the areas of furniture design, construction, and finishing. Techniques will include raised panel construction, dovetail joints, wood turning, inlay, and marquetry. Students will be responsible for purchasing much of their own material.

Fine Woodworking (Standard)
2 Credits (6202) 2 Blocks/1 Semester
Prerequisites:Beginning Woodworking and Advanced Woodworking
Students will learn more advanced woodworking techniques such as mortis and tenon, dovetails and veneering. Students will explore working with hand tools and mastering machinery operations. Students will discover woodworking as an art form through design, wood selection, carving and lathe work. Projects are student driven or students may choose to take on custom orders.

Introduction to Electricity (Standard)
1 Credit/1 Block (6211/6212)
1 or 2 Semesters
2 Credits/2 Blocks (6214/6215)
1 or 2 Semesters
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
Students will become familiar with basic electrical principles such as Ohm’s Law. Each student will acquire a basic knowledge of D.C. and A.C. circuitry, and design, wire, and analyze each circuit. Areas of study will include series and parallel circuits, combination circuits, switching circuits, use of meters, use of various power tools, residential services, appliance circuits, and blueprint reading. This course is an excellent course to strengthen skills for students contemplating entering other craft areas in the construction field. It provides a sound foundation for post secondary study at either two or four-year colleges.

Residential/Industrial Electricity I (Standard)
4 Credits (6217/6218)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisites: Introduction to Electricity or Electricity I; Juniors, Seniors
Residential/Industrial Electricity provides advanced units of study in A.C. and D.C. circuits, motors, motor controls, conduit bending, advanced blueprint reading, and on the job training. Students participate in the State Apprenticeship program and earn credit toward their journeyman’s license.

Residential/Industrial Electricity II (Standard)
4 Credits (6231/6232)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisites: Sustainable Building Practices I or Residential/Industrial Electricity I
Residential/Industrial Electricity II provides advanced units of study in A.C. and D.C. circuits, motors, motor controls, conduit bending, advanced blueprint reading, and on-the-job training. Students participate in the State Apprenticeship program and earn credit toward their journeyman’s license.

Introduction to Construction (Standard)
1Credit (6203)
1 Block/1 Semester
In this introductory course, students will learn the basic skills used in the construction industry.Students will be introduced to shop safety, hand and power tools, and construction math. As the semester progresses, students will learn construction techniques and systems such as: floor systems, wall and ceiling framing, roof framing and applications, stair construction, and basic flooring. This course will focus on teamwork and developing proper worksite communication skills.

Business and Management

Introduction to Business (Standard)
1 Credit (6410) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
This course provides students with insight into the basic foundations of both successful and unsuccessful businesses, allowing students to understand the various forms that an organization can take. Students examine the importance of the environmental, social, global, economic, and technological influences on business, culture, and the economy. Students will participate in business simulations, outline activities, and group projects to enhance problem-solving, decision-making, and team-building skills.

Sales and Marketing (Standard)
1 Credit (6421) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
This course provides a foundation for understanding and applying the functions of sales and marketing within local and global economies, with a particular focus on the language of marketing, historical and current patterns and trends, economic considerations, and technological changes, opportunities, and considerations. Information is presented and explored through a variety of mediums, including chapter work, daily tasks, and small and large scale projects throughout the semester that utilize the skills of multiple styles of learning, addresses cultural components, and provides for real world application of content in a context that students can relate to.

Sales and Marketing (Accelerated)
1 Credit (6423) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Department Permission
This course provides a foundation for understanding and applying the functions of sales and marketing within local and global economies, with a particular focus on the language of marketing, historical and current patterns and trends, economic considerations, and technological changes, opportunities, and considerations. Information is presented and explored through a variety of mediums, including chapter work, daily tasks, various readings, and small and large scale projects throughout the semester that utilize the skills of multiple styles of learning, addresses cultural components, and provides for real world application of content in a context that students can relate to, culminating in the creation of a viable product or service.

Entrepreneurship (Standard)
1 Credit (6422) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
This course provides a foundation for students to become knowledgeable about the impact of entrepreneurs on society from multiple perspectives: business owners, politicians, scientists, artists, consumers, etc. Students are encouraged to make economic and social connections and use the information to explore the creation of new businesses or additions to existing businesses. Utilizing the information gathered students explore phases of businesses from product creation through finance to experience the process of writing a business plan.

Entrepreneurship (Accelerated)
1 Credit (6424) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Department Permission
This course provides a foundation for students to become knowledgeable about the fundamentals of business ownership, as well as the impact of entrepreneurs on society from multiple perspectives: business owners, politicians, scientists, artists, consumers, etc. Students are encouraged to make economic and social connections and use the information to explore the creation of new businesses or additions to existing businesses. Utilizing the information gathered students explore phases of businesses from product creation through finance to experience the process of writing a business plan. Students will be expected to create a viable business plan as well as being the opportunity to compete in a number of business challenges.

Hospitality and Tourism

Restaurants and Food/Beverages Services
Introduction to Culinary Arts (Standard)
1 Credit (6510) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
In this introductory course to the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster, students work in a live professional culinary kitchen to learn what is involved in the culinary trades and the hospitality and tourism cluster in general. Students are exposed to the production of a variety of food types, food handling, safety, sanitation, and presentation. This is an excellent course to acquire knowledge about culinary careers as well as to acquire useful skills such as kitchen safety, sanitation practices, knife skills, baking techniques, cooking methods, and recipe conversions.

Culinary Arts I (Standard)
4 Credits (6511/6512)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisite: Sophomores by permission only, Juniors, Seniors
Working in two professional settings, Culinary Arts I students learn the foundations of professional food service. Professional baking and pastry is taught for one semester in our Streeter Hall bakeshop, where students will be exposed to a broad spectrum of techniques and high quality products. The Hilltopper Restaurant is the setting for our Culinary Prep Skills class; students rotate through all the stations of the café , preparing food for our very popular restaurant. Areas of study include yeast dough production,

à la carte desserts, wedding-cake design, soups, stocks, meat fabrication and sauces, employability skills, nutrition, ServSafe, and more. Students also have the opportunity to participate in off-premise catering, fine-dining dinner, and community service.

Culinary Arts II
4 Credits (6521/6522)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I; Juniors, Seniors
Students build on the skills learned in Culinary I by concentrating on the preparation and service of a range of menus and food styles. Students are immersed in many facets of food service and hospitality management including: menu planning, customer service, ethics, cost analysis, equipment maintenance, purchasing, and à la carte cooking. Students will become acquainted with post-secondary educational options as well as a range of career pathways. Through our current articulation agreement with a number of colleges, students who complete the two-year Culinary Arts program are eligible for a number of scholarships and waived course requirements. Students who pass the NOCTI examination receive the industry-recognized credential of“Certified Secondary Graduate” from the American Culinary Federation. St. Johnsbury Academy is one of 120 secondary programs throughout the United States accredited by the ACF.

Human Services

Introduction to Human Services
1 Credit (6610) 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
In this introductory course to the Human Services career cluster, students receive an overview of the Human Services profession including social services, public safety, child development, early childhood education, health careers, geriatrics, social issues, career exploration, communication, goals, and decision making. One block each week is spent visiting area agencies and working on projects in the community.

Human and Professional Services I (Standard)
2 Credits (6600) 2 Blocks/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Juniors, Seniors
This course begins with the exploration of self and community, moving into the social issues of other cultures. Students will learn about human development, ethics, social issues, and conflict resolution. Students will have internships three days each week and are in the classroom two days each week. Internships are self-selected and provide the student with experience in at least two area agencies of their choice. May result in three college Human Services credits for qualified students. May earn three college credits per course from the Community College of Vermont.

Human and Professional Services II (Standard)
2 Credits (6601) 2 Blocks/1 Semester
Prerequisite: Juniors, Seniors
Build on skills learned in Human and Professional Services I with an emphasis on providing services to individuals and families in all development stages. This course expands the exploration of social issues, ethics, conflict resolution, human development, criminal justice, and geriatric issues. Students serve internships three days each week and are in the classroom environment two days each week. Internships are self-selected and longer in length than Human and Professional Services I. Along with skill development, a secondary goal of these internships is to enhance student preparation for post- secondary life—career or college. May earn three college credits per course from the Community College of Vermont.

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (TDL)

Transportation, distribution, and logistics workers move people and products by road, air, rail, and water. They work as drivers, pilots, engineers, or captains; repair, maintain, design, or build the vehicles, trains, planes, and ships that move people and products; or work behind the scene to make sure the products and people get to the right place on time.

Introduction to Automotive Technology (Standard)
1 Credit (6910) 1 Block/One Semester

In this introductory course, students will explore entry level automotive maintenance. Students will be introduced to work place safety, engine diagnostics, exploration of suspension and brake systems, and introduction to electrical systems. Students will also explore minor body repair. The course is designed to prepare students for Auto Technology I.

Introduction to Welding (Standard)
1 Credit (6806) / 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisites: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
In this introductory course to the Manufacturing career cluster, students are introduced to elementary practices of welding. Students explore basic welding types (SMAW, GMAW, GTAW, CRSW and Oxy-fuel welding), two types of metal cutting (Oxy-fuel and Plasma Arc), the basic welding symbols, and a weldment drawing, the basic techniques for material preparations. This course uses both group and individual projects and problem-based scenarios as instructional opportunities. Students practice general employability skills such as effective communication, interpersonal skills, and presentation skills. The course is a recommended for students interested in Automotive Technology I.

Advanced Welding (Accelerated)
1 Credit (6607) / 1 Block/1 Semester
Prerequisites:Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors; Introduction to Welding (Standard)
In this advanced course, students are introduced to advanced practices of welding. Students continue to develop competence in SMAW, GMAW, GTAW in all positions, develop skills needed for AWS flat certification in SMAW, understand the metallurgy of common metal for welding, explore GTAW for Stainless and Aluminum and thin metals, and become competent understanding welding symbols and interpreting weldment drawing.Students will also practice creating a welding project from estimating to building. This course uses both group and individual projects and problem-based scenarios as instructional tools. Students practice general employability skills such as effective communication, interpersonal skills, and presentation skills.

Automotive Technology I
4 Credits (6911/6912)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisite: Juniors, Seniors
Auto Mechanics I offers hands-on shop experience and problem-based learning in a fully equipped mobile equipment repair (mechanics) and/or collision-repair (auto body and painting) facility. Students will learn about areas of the automotive industry as well as transferable skills that apply to automotive systems, oversee scheduling of appointments, ordering parts, managing stock items, assessing collision damage, and mixing and applying modern automotive finishes.

Auto Mechanics I provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions about pursuing a career in the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics career cluster. This course is an excellent choice for all students who will need to understand and maintain their own vehicles and equipment or those who wish to follow this path to post-secondary education and employment.

Automotive Technology II
4 Credits (6931/6932)
2 Blocks/2 Semesters
Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I; Seniors
In Auto Mechanics II students focus their efforts in a specific career concentration continuing to build on the skills and knowledge learned in Auto Mechanics I while focusing on skills and knowledge specific to their choice. Students will be encouraged to pursue further education, obtain ASE or ICAR credentials and/or seek an apprenticeship program in the industry.