All 2019 Workshops

Session 1 — JULY 7-12

The workshop sessions are small, averaging fewer than 15 participants. Each session is designed to meet the needs of the individual participants to ensure that each teacher returns to the classroom with increased confidence and strategies for success.

The leaders are experienced AP teachers with outstanding reputations in public and private schools. All serve as readers at their respective AP readings and are endorsed by the College Board to lead AP workshops. Many of our consultants are table leaders and members of their respective course’s test development committee.

Art and Design

Instructor: Joann Winkler

AP Art and Design (formerly Studio Art)

The objective of this course is to provide both new and experienced AP® Art and Design teachers with an understanding of the requirements of the UPDATED course and portfolios. This course is designed to assist high school teachers of AP® Art and Design in understanding, planning, and teaching the course while assessing student progress. The goal is preparing students to successfully develop their portfolios. The rubrics for each section of the three portfolios will be reviewed and by the end of the session, teachers will be more effective in evaluating their students’ work and assisting them in achieving higher AP® scores.

An emphasis will be placed on ideation and strategies for assisting students in the selection of Sustained Investigation topics that are viable and inventive. Studio sessions will be dedicated to the development of a mini investigation, using action research, inquiry and exploration. Participants will engage in the same kind of creative problem solving that they will ask of their students.

The format of the Institute will include informal lectures, digital presentations and studio activities. All participants will be encouraged to share best practices and some exercises will be completed in small groups. Group critiques and activities will be conducted with an emphasis on process and the development of a theme or idea that can generate continued investigation. Participants should be prepared to share their innovative approaches with other workshop members. Museum experience will provide curriculum ideas and add strategies to enhancing student artwork.

Daily agenda will include, but is not limited to:

  1. An overview of The College Board UPDATEDportfolio materials and requirement
  2. Training materials from the 2019 Reading
  3. The Reading process

Participants can expect to:

  • Engage in inquiry and investigation through practice, experimentation, revision and reflection,
  • Investigate themes from Contemporary Art to inspire curriculum,
  • Collaborate with studio and seminar sessions structured to address the use of contemporary art practices,
  • Develop ideation for the Sustained Investigation that can support investigative research about an artistic concern,
  • Create art to support the research based inquiry into a mini investigation
  • Develop sketchbook and process strategies,
  • Select art for the Selected Works section,
  • Share strategies for portfolio development with hands-on approaches to work,
  • Review the UPDATED rubrics and use to score portfolios through mock readings
  • Museum or gallery exercises (subject to availability)

Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops, flash drives, sketchbooks, and favorite media to support art-makingin the 2D, 3D or Drawing portfolio. If possible bring utensils to cut and adhesives of choice in addition to collage making materials.

Calculus AB

Instructor: Eliel Gonzalez

In this institute participants will experience a complete overview of the new AP Calculus AB curriculum frameworks with emphasis on appropriate use of graphing calculator, content and pacing, and global review for the AP exam. We will also review content and pedagogy in the following topics: related rates, area/volume, differential equations/slope fields, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, implicit differentiation, L’Hopital’s Rule and other topics. A special focus on assessment and motivation will help participants incorporate new strategies to build a successful AP Calculus program.Participants are asked to bring a graphing calculator.

Biology

Instructor: Elizabeth Cowles

The “test drive” of the new AP Biology curriculum and examination is over, so it is time for a thorough assessment. We will perform the laboratories and alternatives. We’ll review the curriculum – from the Big Ideas to the learning objectives – and discuss new materials (texts, study guides.). We will explore how to make adjustments to the curriculum. Throughout the week, participants have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the course audit. We will discuss the 2017 exam results and best teaching practices to help our students succeed.

Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop, an inquiry-based laboratory or case study to share, and a willingness to exchange effective teaching practices/activities with peers in our group discussions.

Calculus AB Experienced

Instructor: Vic Levine

This course is designed for teachers who have already taught the AB curriculum and are comfortable with the AP program. The AB curriculum will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the topics the participants desire. We will look at proofs of the basic theorems of AB calculus, as well as more in depth explorations of differential and integral calculus applications.
In addition, we will look at first semester college calculus topics that are not part of the AB curriculum. The specific topics will be determined by the group.

These sessions will cover all topics on the Calculus AB syllabus which includes limits and continuity, definition of the derivative, applications of the derivative, rate of change, Mean Value Theorem, Riemann sums, the definite integral by geometric and analytic means, average value, anti-differentiation,, applications of integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, slope fields, applications of anti-differentiation and separable differential equations.

This institute will focus on the content knowledge described in the AP syllabus as well as techniques and ideas for developing a successful AP program. We will cover topic content, strategies, and teaching techniques for presenting the material for student understanding will be shared. We will use multiple representations graphical, numerical, analytic, and verbal to foster a more complete understanding of calculus.

Sample problems from previous AP exams will be given and solved together to develop an understanding of the material and the College Board philosophy. Participants will also receive a variety of classroom tested activities and calculator programs to enhance their own teaching. We will discuss ways to prepare students for the AP exam. Participants will also get several current textbooks and resource materials. Instructors will be sharing their extensive files.

Participants should bring a TI 83/84 graphing calculator and a laptop as we will look at many free web-based resources. St. Johnsbury does provide free internet access in the classrooms and dorms.

Chemistry

Instructor: Michael Schaab

Chemistry participants should be prepared for an intensive overview of the Advanced Placement Chemistry course with particular attention being paid to laboratory work, the structure and content of the AP examination and a number of key curricular areas. We will begin with a brief discussion of the general issues that all AP teachers grapple with including timetable variations, course outlines, resources and the development of a syllabus suitable for the College Board’s Course Audit. The development of the examination rubric, the setting of standards and the process of applying them to the AP examination will be explained by an experienced exam reader. Curricular areas unique to AP Chemistry will be linked to a large variety of previous examination questions. A series of one dozen different laboratory activities will be performed and discussed. Participants can expect an institute focused largely on the inquiry-based approach that is central to the AP Chemistry course. A collaborative approach will be used so come prepared to share favorite demonstrations, lab exercises and other best practices. Teachers will leave with a wealth of knowledge, a stack of textbooks and access to a load of internet-based resources.

Greetings,

I am eagerly anticipating working with you this summer at the AP chemistry summer institute in St Johnsbury. Our work will focus on the AP chemistry curriculum and how this is reflected in the exam. The curriculum for the AP chemistry program will appear differently starting in the 2019 – 2020 school year. While the new curriculum will continue to focus on the reasoning and inquiry skills that are essential for success at the college level, the course framework will follow a unit sequence that is more in line with textbook sequence and how most teachers currently teach the course. The curricular components (Learning Objectives, Essential Knowledge, Enduring Understandings and Science Practices) remain largely unchanged, but are realigned to the new sequence. Additionally, there are new resources available to AP teachers such as progress checks and a question bank that are designed to aid both students and teachers. We will examine and discuss what has changed and the new resources with an eye toward determining how each teacher may want to make use of the new curriculum and resources.

We will also perform a variety of different labs from most of the major topics. The labs will demonstrate the four levels of inquiry: confirmation,structured inquiry, guided inquiry, and open inquirywith the major focus being on guided inquiry. The practicality and fundamental concepts as well as the results and analysis will be discussed after each experiment. We will also examine the pedagogical and practical components of a strong and successful AP Chemistry program and discuss the challenges and triumphs we’ve had in our classrooms providing insight into what we do best. Our discussions will look toward incorporating new strategies that will strengthen your program. There will be time devoted to working on creating both multiple choice and free response questions that align with the learning objectives and science practices. Several sessions will be devoted to examining classroom approaches to inquiry where emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and analysis outside of the laboratory. We will discuss and practice activities that include formative assessment, group discussion, presentation, and prediction. If the group feels it is important, we will dedicate time to working on a syllabus that reflects the requirements of the course and prepares for the course audit.Most importantly, we will talk about any and all topics you wish to discuss. You should plan to bring a calculator, laptop, plenty of questions, and your expertise to share with the group. If you have materials you would like to distribute to the other participants, please send them to me electronically (mschaab@mma.edu) sometime before the institute or bring them with you and I will make copies for everyone.

Since we will be in a laboratory setting you should bring long pants and closed-toe shoes. Goggles will be provided, but you might prefer to bring your own pair.

I know you’ll contribute and learn a great deal from all that the institute and your colleagues have to offer. Bring your enthusiasm, your curiosity, and your appetite.

I am looking forward to working with you all. Please feel free to email or call (207-922-8812) if you have any questions or concerns.

Best Regards,

Mike

Comparative Government

Instructor: Betsy Heckman

AP Comparative Government and Politics prepares students to become citizens in an increasingly interconnected world. It focuses upon important themes and concepts, including globalization and democratization. Specific case studies include the United Kingdom, the European Union, Russia, the People’s Republic of China, Mexico, Iran, and Nigeria. Cross-country comparisons are made throughout the course. Perhaps more than any other AP course, AP Comparative Government and Politics enables students to analyze world events and broaden their perspectives.

Dear Participant:

Welcome to AP Comparative Government and Politics! It is my pleasure to work with you in St. Johnsbury. I have been teaching this course since 2004, and it is my passion. In addition to attending the AP Reading at a reader, table leader and question leader, I have also served on the Test Development Committee for APCG since 2013. I have just concluded my second year as the co-chair of the committee. This will be my fourth summer teaching at AP Summer Institutes. While nothing replaces teaching young people about the world in which we live, I greatly enjoy helping new and experienced teachers navigate the complex curriculum of APCG and spreading the enthusiasm for teaching this course.

This workshop will focus on what is changing and what is not changing about AP Comparative Government and Politics. Participants will be introduced to the new Course and Exam Description. We will focus on how the structure of the course is changing, but the content is not. In addition, we will go over the significant changes to the AP exam and how teachers can best prepare their students for the summative assessment in May. It will also be important for participants to become familiar with the new resources being provided by the College Board, including the Personal Progress Checks and AP Question Bank. Finally, for those new to the discipline, the workshop will include a review of key concepts and critical content for the six countries covered in the course. Participants will come away with a solid understanding of what the course is about as well as how to plan their course and prepare for the exam.

It will be useful for participants to bring a laptop or equivalent electronic device to be able to access Internet sources and complete activities. During the week, participants will be asked to create a pacing guide based on the new Course and Exam Description. Access to a school calendar will be essential for this activity.

I look forward to meeting and working with you this summer. AP Comparative Government is arguably the most dynamic AP course to teach. While this can be intimidating, by working together and pooling resources, teaching this course is not only manageable but incredibly rewarding. If you have any questions before the workshop, please feel free to reach out to me.

Best,

Betsy Heckman

bheckman@westminster-school.org

Computer Science A

Instructor: Maria Litvin

The course accommodates participants with different levels of familiarity with Java and OOP. We will study classes and objects, constructors and methods, interfaces and inheritance, strings, arrays and ArrayList, and other topics specified in the AP CS Course Description. We will also review the College Board’s AP materials, work with the “Magpie,” “Pictures,” and “Elevens” labs, recommended by the Development Committee, review the free-response questions from the latest AP CS Exam, and discuss techniques for teaching Java in high school (role play, team projects).

Dear colleague:

I look forward to working with you at the AP Summer Institute in Computer Science A in St. Johnsbury Academy this summer. Our goals of the APSI include learning topics of the AP Computer Science A, based on the new course and exam description (CED updated by the College Board for the academic year 2019-20, and sharing and exploring innovative teaching practices. Whether you are new to Java or someone who taught AP CSA before, you will find our discussions and labs useful while challenging and fun.

Our APSI will involve a great deal of hands-on lab work and classroom discussion.

We will use Oracle’s Java 10 or Java 12 on the computers in the lab: oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html,

together with Eclipse IDE on the Windows computers (the software is free). If you plan to use your own Mac or Windows laptop, please bring it with the Java software installed (download the latest versions of Java SE and Eclipse IDE). Instead of Eclipse, you may use any Java IDE of your choice. Information about getting started with Java and which software to download and install is at: skylit.com/javamethods/faqs/index.html.

In addition, please “Download student files” (studentdisk.zip) for

Java Methods: Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures from: skylit.com/javamethods/index.html (a CD icon is in the shaded right column).

Our textbook is Java Methods: Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures, 3nd AP Edition, by Maria Litvin & Gary Litvin, Skylight Publishing, 2015. You will receive a copy of this book at the workshop.

To practice writing Java code, do a few exercises suggested at codingbat.com, Practice It Java: practiceit.cs.washington.edu/, and https://codestepbystep.com/.

College Board’s AP Central website for the AP Computer Science A course is apcentral.collegeboard.com/compscia. Links to many useful materials are collected at skylit.com/cblinks.html.

If you have technical questions or concerns, please e-mail me at mlitvin@andover.edu.

See you in July,

Maria

Economics (Micro/Macro Combined)

Instructor: Patty Brazill

Throughout our short four and a half days together, the goal is for each participant to come away better prepared to teach AP Economics. This objective will be achieved through an intensive review of specific content, as listed in the Acorn Book, published by the College Board. Lessons on more difficult concepts will be modeled. Participants will study the design of the currently available part two questions and learn the use of rubrics in the grading process. A session will be dedicated to setting up the course, either for a single semester or for a year, with a focus on the redesigned course coming in 2020. Various texts and ancillary materials will be available for evaluation. I will establish a network of support for teachers seeking help in any content area.

I plan a dual approach, providing participants the opportunity to focus on their needs, based on their course design: macro only, micro only, or combined, in order to prepare teachers for teaching AP Economics through an intensive review of curriculum content, textbook evaluations and time management. Teacher will be able to choose which course topics to focus on as I plan a module approach focusing on the difficult topics in each course.

I will model for participant’s lessons on challenging economic concepts, including: graphing of market models, externalities, Aggregate Demand and Supply, Monetary policy, loanable funds market, MRP and others.
The goal is to clearly identify for teachers the need to know concepts and models, as well as provide guidelines for those concepts which will enrich the AP classroom.
We plan a dual approach with two presenters, providing participants the opportunity to focus on their needs, based on their course design: macro only, micro only, or combined, in order to prepare teachers for teaching AP Economics through an intensive review of curriculum content, textbook evaluations and time management. Teacher will be able to choose which course topics to focus on as we plan a module approach focusing on the difficult topics in each course.

We will model for participant’s lessons on challenging economic concepts, including: graphing of market models, externalities, Aggregate Demand and Supply, Monetary policy, loanable funds market, MRP and others.
Our goal is to clearly identify for teachers the need to know concepts and models, as well as provide guidelines for those concepts which will enrich the AP classroom.

Dear Macro/micro economics participants,

Welcome to the St. Johnsbury Academy summer institute – a camp-like learning environment for educators. I am excited to work with you all in this intimate and inspirational setting. We have our work cut out for us – we will cover all the key elements for teaching both courses, although our focus will be determined by the needs of the group. This year there is a new course exam and description binder you will all receive. There will be a new digital platform for you to use with your students. We will have less time for content but will focus more on how to teach the courses.

Please write to me before the institute and let me know if you will be preparing for Micro, Macro, or both courses. Let me know your experience level both with teaching the courses and with economics in general. We will have a huge variety of expertise so don’t feel intimidated if you are brand new! If you are seasoned veteran, you will still learn new strategies from our collaboration.

If you have taught the course, please bring a lesson to share. Bring a laptop! And if you know which text you will be using be sure to bring that along as well.

Keep in mind, this is summer camp. Be ready to hike, bike, kayak, swim, or just relax and read in a beautiful setting. And come with an appetite for learning and wonderful feasts.

Please reach out to me with any questions. See you all soon.

Warm regards,

Patti

phbrazill@gmail.com

English Language

Instructor: Peter Durnan

Over the course of the week we will fully review the AP English Language and Composition curriculum and exam. Participants will review and practice skills of argumentation and rhetorical analysis and share best practices. We will be visited by a guest writer and take advantage of local art to augment the experience. The week is intended to address the practice of inexperienced and experienced teachers.

English Literature

Instructor: Marilee Eyre

Beaver High School

Beaver, UT 84713

May 15, 2019

Dear Colleague:

Welcome to St. Johnsbury Academy’s Summer Advanced Placement Institute. I am delighted you are going to attend my session this summer. I am looking forward to meeting you and working with you.

Each day the workshop will have three sessions that last approximately two hours. I will share materials and ideas according to the following outline, but we will reserve plenty of time for your questions and concerns as well as time for you to share your ideas.

Please bring copies of a teaching unit, lesson play, or activity you enjoy. This can be a unit or activity you have used in any English class.

Tentative Schedule

Monday

Introductions, overview, and planning AP course.

Equitable Access.

Examine AP Exam Question 1.

View, grade, and discuss exam samples and rubrics.

Discuss structure, tone, and various reading strategies.

Share units, lesson plans, and activities.

Tuesday

Read and discuss AP Exam Question 2.

View, grade, and discuss exam samples and rubrics.

Discuss literary terms, syntax, diction, and narrative pace.

Look at various ways to practice prose devices, vocabulary, and revision.

Share units, lesson plans, and activities.

Wednesday

Focus on AP Exam Question3.

View, grade, and discuss exam samples and rubrics.

Discuss novels, plays, and activities including reading strategies

Analyze literary criticism, themes and best practices for Question 3.

Share units, lesson plans, and activities.

Thursday

Analyze multiple-choice strategies.

Discuss reading and poetry explication methods and activities.

AP Central.

Visit St. Johnsbury’s Art Museum: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

Marilee Eyre 2 May 15, 2019

Friday

Share poems

Share ideas about using art in AP English.

Evaluations.

I would love to hear from you. If you would like, send me an email introducing yourself and tell me how long you have been teaching AP English and what you would like to obtain from the Institute.

Sincerely,

Marilee Eyre -- AP Consultant (435) 421-9060

390 East 100 South

PO Box 1092

Beaver, UT 84713-1092

Email: marilee.eyre@beaver.k12.ut.us

English Literature Experienced

Instructor: Robert Brown

Participants in this advanced workshop for experienced AP English Literature teachers will explore literature from the inside, from the perspective of “teacher as writer.” Under the guidance of guest artists – successful authors of “AP worthy” texts – participants will work on short creative writing prompts in the genres of fiction and poetry, receiving guidance and feedback as they share their work. Participants will work with novelist Maria Hummel, author of Motherland (2014) and Still Lives, which is due out this summer. (www.mariahummel.com), and with poet Kerrin McCadden, associate director of the Conference on Poetry and Teaching at the Frost Place, in Franconia NH. (www.kerrinmccadden.com) Concurrently, participants will examine and discuss selected texts with an eye toward enriching their own AP English Literature courses. AP consultant and workshop leader Rob Brown will cover current developments in the AP English Literature program, along with practice in applying AP standards in the assessment of student work.

European History

Instructor: James Kirkcaldy

This will be an intensive five-day workshop for new and experienced teachers of AP European History. The workshop will emphasize teaching strategies and activities that are especially designed for use in a tightly paced AP course. We will concentrate on pacing, core concepts, recent historiography, alternative assessments, and the grading rubric for the A.P. exam. Participants will also receive a 300 page AP European History Workbook prepared by the instructor, plus over 200 powerpoint presentations (each with a worksheet) that have been especially created for students to use at home in order to give teachers the option to “flip” their classroom allowing for more student centered learning in the class. Participants will also receive hundreds of activities, supplementary readings and visuals suitable for AP instruction. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to share lessons and activities with their colleagues. The workshop is designed to be an enjoyable sharing experience that will give participants the confidence and ability to affectively teach a great course.

French

Instructor: Mona Mulhair

Session outline for the French Test
Goals & Objectives
1. To provide the participants with ideas and techniques (Vertical Team Concept) – To prepare the students from the basic level to the AP French Language and Culture.
2. To familiarize participants with the content and the structure of the different components of the AP French test.
3. To present the three modes of written and spoken communication defined in the Standards for Foreign Language learning in the 21st Century.
4. To familiarize the participants with the Presentational, the Interpersonal and the interpretive modes of Communication in Speaking and Writing.
5. To share materials and techniques that will assist the participants to understand the new approach and will help their students to succeed on their AP test.
6. To present the cultural approach and material to be incorporated at all levels of instruction.
7. To present the websites available and how to integrate the authentic material in their daily teaching.
8. To present the six essential themes and the sub-topics recommended to be integrated in the daily instruction.
9. To provide the participants with time and opportunity for collegial interaction and exchange of successful strategies.

Human Geography

Instructor: Lili Monk

Advanced Placement Human Geography is a high school course equivalent to a one semester introductory college course in Human Geography. Course topics include the nature and perspectives of geography, population, cultural geography, industrialization and economic geography, agriculture and rural land use, urban geography, and political geography.The workshop will focus on the new course articulation for AP Human Geography developed in 2013. During the workshop, participants will be exposed to content information and will be expected to develop lessons, activities, and testing items. Suggested teaching materials and techniques will be reviewed. This includes syllabi, texts, videos/DVDs, computer software, web sites, and other resources. Participants will also be instructed in how the AP® Human Geography exam is prepared and scored. An additional goal for the week will be to develop meaningful field trips (even in urban areas!) to enhance the curriculum. Teachers should bring their 2018-19 school calendars, and are encouraged (but not required) to read either Connectography: Mapping the Global Network Revolution by Parag Khanna, or Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps that Explain Everything About the World by Tim Marshall.

US Government and Politics

Instructor: Rachel Ryan

This course is being offered for the new and experienced teacher of US Government and Politics who wants to learn about the redesign of the course that went into effect for the 2018-2019 school year. This workshop will also cover the entire scope and curriculum for the course. Participants will come away from the workshop with an understanding of the content of the course, how to pace the course and how to design assessments to maximize learning and AP exam preparation. We will have time to work on course syllabi to fulfill the College Board audit. Best practices and assessments will be provided and shared and at the end of the week all participants will be able to return to their classrooms with new skills, content and assessments prepared and ready to implement. I will also weave quite a few technological resources into the course that can be used but both student and teacher.

Dear Participant,

I am so pleased that you have signed up to take my workshop on the new AP US Government and Politics exam. This is an exciting year to be teaching the course and taking the workshop as the course and the exam have just completed the first year with the redesign. My goal for this workshop is to help you feel comfortable with and excited about the new curriculum framework.

Please fill out this Google form if you are coming the week of July 7th and this Google form if you are coming the week of July 14th so I can find out more about you and make sure I answer any questions that you have going into the workshop. I took the AP US Government and Politics course and exam the first year it was offered in 1987-88. I have been teaching the course since the mid-1990s and have been an AP exam reader since 2006. I have had extensive training in the new curriculum framework and I have a plethora of resources, lessons and assignments and assessments to share with you. You will leave my workshop with a whole series of takeaways that will enable you to successfully teach the new course.

One of the best things about workshops for teachers, is we all learn from each other so be prepared to share your best practices, ask great questions and absorb what everyone else is bringing to the class. Feel free to bring in assessments and activities that work and even don’t work as we can learn from those as well. Bring your textbook and other resources worth sharing. I will set up a shared Google folder that will enable us to share information easily.

Along with your textbook, also bring your school calendar and any curriculum requirements so we can begin to work on our syllabi for the AP Audit. II am looking forward to meeting you this summer.

Sincerely,

Rachael A. Ryan

The Taft School

ryanr@taftschool.org

Physics I

Instructor: Barry Panas

In this week-long institute we will be covering all of the essentials needed to teach AP Physics 1 including the Curriculum Frameworks, Course Audits, and Exams.

A significant portion of the week will focus on Inquiry Based Learning and establishing an AP Physics experience that maximizes student learning. Numerous practical tips will be provided throughout the week on teaching strategies, demonstrations, audiovisuals, computer-based learning opportunities and teaching resources. Participants will have opportunities throughout the week to ask questions and to share their own strategies and approaches with other participants.

The week will also include significant content reinforcement. Topics addressed will include content that is new to the AP program, selected traditional areas that are especially problematic, as well as any other topics requested by participants. A number of experiments will be discussed and a selection of labs will be conducted by participants.

Participants are asked to bring the following to the institute:

— a calculator and laptop

— one or two Physics demonstrations to perform for the group during the week

— a written summary of a lab suitable for use in AP physics. This lab will not be conducted during the institute, but each participant will briefly present it to the group. If the lab has handouts, they should also be provided.

Psychology

Instructor: Lori Hodin

This hands-on workshop will provide participants with an overview of the structure and content of an AP Psychology course. Participants will analyze past AP exams and participate in a simulated AP reading to evaluate student writing. Interactive demonstrations, online resources and discussions will provide participants with opportunities to learn about how to integrate new research in psychology into their teaching.

This workshop is updated to address the College Board's changes to the AP Psychology Course and Exam Description (CED). Key changes in the AP Psychology exam include: organizing the course into 9 units instead of 14, learning targets and skills specified in the CED and FRQs will always be 7 points. I will also share new resources and supports from the College Board.

This session is open to teachers with all levels of experience.

Spanish Language and Culture

Instructor: Patricia Smith

In May of 2014, the AP Spanish Language Exam was adapted to include culture. This course will address the redesign of the exam, and train experienced and new AP teachers to prepare their students for the exam. Teachers are encouraged to go to this web site to read more about the new course; http://advancesinap.collegeboard.org. All AP Spanish Language and Culture teachers need to submit a syllabus directed to this exam. Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit.

We will discuss how to teach for improvement in interpretive communication, and will spend considerable time reviewing strategies for interpersonal writing and speaking, and presentational writing and speaking. Much practice in the workshop will be directed towards the teaching of cultural comparisons, and in activities to strengthen the students’ awareness of cultural diversity.

Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit. Patricia Smith is an experienced Spanish Language Consultant who will guide you throughout the week as you prepare this syllabus. Topics to be discussed during the week will include:

Course Description, Planning and Pacing Guide for Course
Standards for Foreign Language Learning
AP Spanish Language and Culture Practice Exam
Three modes of communication
Emphasis on cultures of Spanish-speaking world
Analysis of the six themes on which the course is based
Curriculum framework and learning objectives
Strategies of teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing
Cooperative learning
Becoming an AP Reader
AP Equity and Access
Differentiated instruction

May 20, 2019

Dear Spanish AP Language and Culture Institute Participant:

I am very much looking forward to our week together. We will be talking about how to set up a successful AP Spanish Language and Culture program, and/or how to expand upon an existing one. Please email me in Spanish once you get this letter: patricia.t.smith@comcast.net. Please introduce yourself, describe your school and your classes, and tell me what you hope to get out of this course. By the end of the Institute, you will have a very good understanding of exactly what makes up the AP exam, what is expected of the students, and how the exam is graded. You will be receiving many handouts, as well as a useful manual from the College Board.

We will all be sharing ideas, and I ask that you bring with you the textbooks you are using. Please bring with you any essays or CDs of your own students, with the names removed. You can also bring videos or DVDs of student projects or skits, if you would like to share them and get feedback.

Please read all the materials currently available on AP Central about the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam. See this site: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-span...

Before coming, please go to the website of ACTFL and read about World Readiness Standards and Can Do Statements. Be ready to talk about what skills and themes you deal with in your classes, at all levels. We will discuss Vertical Teaming, and how faculty can cooperate at all levels. Please reflect upon this before coming.

We will be working on the development of syllabus outlines. During the week, each participant will begin to write a unit description, according to one of the six themes. Therefore, please bring a copy of your school calendar. You will give me a preliminary copy of this guide at the end of the week. Whatever you create, the idea is that it will be something you NEED and something you will USE. The wonderful thing about a week-long Institute is the opportunity to work together with colleagues, and get feedback from me and from them. We all know that during the school year there is never time for this!

A little about me: I have a BA in Spanish and French from St. Lawrence University. I taught at the secondary level from 1970-2002, with 14 years teaching AP Spanish Language. Most of the time I was at Braintree High School, south of Boston. I am now teaching at the college level, at Tufts University. My masters is in Spanish Language, from Middlebury. I have an additional M.Ed in Special Education from Bridgewater State College, Massachusetts. I have been an AP Reader since 1987, of both literature and language exams. I have also served as a Table Leader for the AP Spanish Literature and Culture exam. I have been conducting workshops for the College Board since 2001.

Currently I am involved in a project researching historical memory in Spain.

One final request: Make a list of all your thoughts and ideas as you peruse the materials on AP Central, and come prepared for a week of immersion in Spanish, with an opportunity for new friendships and sharing.

No veo la hora de conocerles.

Hasta pronto,

Patricia Smith

Statistics

Instructor: Laura Marshall

The objectives of this weeklong workshop are straightforward: to help our participants do a better job teaching AP Statistics and to improve their students’ scores on the AP Exam.

We will examine the College Board’s outline of topics and course philosophy, discuss the course expectations, and share strategies for success on the AP exam. Additionally, we will review and clarify important concepts in Statistics and provide guidance and answer questions about the subject matter. We will also explore pedagogy, looking at sample lessons, classroom activities, effective demos, and possibilities for projects. Finally, we’ll look at a variety of resources, including textbooks, calculators, videos, software, and other materials.

Whether you are new to AP Statistics or a veteran educator, you’ll come away with lots of valuable insights (and have fun, too)!

Dear AP Statistics Participant,

Welcome to St. Johnsbury, Vermont! The Northeast Kingdom of Vermont in July is an incredibly beautiful location. I look forward to working with you this summer and believe that you will find our time together a wonderful professional development experience. I am a high school teacher at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. I have been involved in AP Statistics since 1998. I am a former reader and table leader. Currently, I serve as a question leader on the operational exam at the reading. For the past seven years, I have served on the Test Development Committee for AP Statistics.

During our week together, we will review the entire course beginning with exploring data. We will spend time on sampling and experimental design, then anticipating patterns and finally, statistical inference. We will spend time working on AP problems, both free response and multiple choice. Most importantly, you will work through many activities that you can bring back to your classroom. Some new resources will be available this August from College Board. We will talk about these resources and discuss how you might utilize them in your classes. We will also talk about the re-articulation of the course description.

Typically, teachers with varying levels of experience will be in our group. We can all learn from each other and share our teaching strategies and experiences. If you are new to AP Statistics and have never taught the course before, please do not worry. But be prepared to learn much this week.

I plan to use a TI-84 calculator for demonstration but am also very familiar with the statistical features of the TI-89. Please bring a calculator with you if you have one. If you do not have one, please let me know. You will also need a laptop or tablet as most of the materials will be distributed electronically. And finally, if you have a textbook that you use or will be using, it may be helpful to bring that.

Although we will work hard, there will be plenty of opportunities for fun and comradery! So be prepared to laugh, play and converse. If you have any questions before we meet, please feel free to email me at lemvtnh@gmail.com.

I look forward to meeting you!

Laura E. Marshall

US History

Instructor: Tracey Wilson

This workshop is designed for both new and experienced teachers and will focus on the recently redesigned AP US History course and exam. The new curriculum framework establishes a specific set of historical thinking skills and thematic learning objectives which helps teachers organize the content starting in 1491 and ending in the present. The workshop will explore best practices for bringing together skills, themes, and content in the classroom and will provide opportunities for participants to work with peers, share ideas, lessons, and best practices. Teachers will learn how they have more freedom to develop courses that challenge their students in their schools.

Teachers will wrestle with how to teach the best US History college level survey course they can teach through addressing compelling questions, primary sources, the course syllabus, and running classroom discussions.

World History

Instructor: Lenore Schneider

The AP World History workshop is designed to help both new and experienced teachers and will focus on recent changes to the AP World History Exam. The instructor, who has taught the course for sixeen years and has been a Table Leader at the Reading for many years, will address some of the key challenges of the course: coverage of the content in the new Curriculum Framework, pacing, development of critical thinking skills, success on the test questions, and stimulating student engagement. Participants will examine the Multiple Choice questions, Short Answer Questions, the Document Based Essay and the Long Essay Question in terms of strategies to succeed on the new test. They will examine the College Board scoring rubrics and will utilize them to analyze sample student exam essays. The workshop is interactive so that teachers can replicate the activities in their own classrooms. Participants are also encouraged to bring some of their best practices (lessons, resources, unit plans, books, films, and/or syllabi) for sharing and discussion with the group. The instructor will provide a thumb drive of hundreds of files, including Power Point presentations, assignments, tests, projects, performance assessments, and teaching strategies. Most of the strategies are also applicable in regular section world history classes.

Dear Participant,

Thank you for taking time from your summer vacation to attend the AP World History workshop, and I hope you will find it to be a valuable experience. My plan is to equip you to help your students effectively, particularly in response to the redesign of the Curriculum Framework and the new AP World History Exam format. PLUS, there are many new resources available! Please respond to the survey I will send, with your teaching experience, AP experience (if any) and any special requests you have, and I will shape the workshop to fit your experience and expectations.

I have taught AP World History for fifteen years, and I continue to revise the course as I learn new content and strategies. I am also a Table Leader/Reader of the Exam essays, and I will share insights from the 2019 Reading. In addition to providing guidance regarding the new curriculum and the AP Exam, I will bring sample AP Exam essays and rubrics to our workshop. It is important to examine the nuances of the changes in the rubrics. I will also share content, materials (including primary sources, web sites, video clips, Power Point presentations, tests, and simulations) and strategies.

Another benefit of the APSI Workshops is the dynamism of the other teachers, which has contributed to a stimulating environment and the value of sharing ideas and strategies. Anypertinent materials you can bring, even if you have never taught AP World History, will be embraced! It would be great if you could bring "gems" on a flash drive or via a Google Drive link. Given the new direction of the AP World History test, it would be especially helpful if you could include as many visuals (political cartoons, links/copies of key paintings, charts, graphs, etc.) to share. As you know, teachers like to acquire as many options as possible, and the exchange of ideas is a genuine benefit of the workshop. Although most materials will be shared digitally, it is also helpful to bring a binder and three-hole punch for some of the handouts. Each participant will share a favorite lesson.

Although you can submit an APAudit Syllabus from the AP Central website for official purposes, I recommend that you bring a copy of your textbook, your school calendar, and any curriculum requirements of your state and/or school so that you can plan your course to fit your students’ needs, especially given the new curriculum framework and format of the exam. Pacing is important!

Best wishes for a successful end of the school year, and I look forward to meeting you this summer!

Sincerely,

Dr. Lenore Schneider

New Canaan High School

lenoreschn@sbcglobal.net

AP WORLD HISTORY

2019 WORKSHOP CONTENT

Dr. Lenore Schneider

GOALS: Participants will understand the

  • Value and challenge of teaching AP World History
  • Historical Thinking Skills
  • Curriculum Framework: themes, regions, periodization, content, concepts, learning objectives
  • Components and scoring of the APWH
  • Ways to differentiate instruction to support the equity and access results
  • Variety of teaching strategies to address the challenge of the course and to enable students to improve their literacy and analytical skills
  • Elements of a strong syllabus; resource options value and components of performance assessments

NB: Sharing of “best practices” from participants throughout the workshop

DAY 1

Session 1: Introductions; overview of AP World History and changes!

RESOURCES: College Board Handbook; AP Central, AP Community; selection of textbooks, resources, websites; use of films; primary sources; secondary sources

Overview of new resources: CED, Unit guides, PPTs, Question Bank, Progress Dashboard

Session 2: Historical Thinking Skills: THE DRIVER!!

Developing Student Understanding

Equity and Access: importance; strategies

Fall Student Registration

Initial activities and supports

Session 3: Overview of Curriculum Framework: “dare to omit”

Framing the course: Pacing; Periodization, Themes

Syllabus development; lesson planning

Overview of the Exam

Session 4: Key concepts; Learning Objectives

Strategies for teaching background to 1200 (participants share as well as instructor)

Introduction to Multiple Choice

DAY TWO

Session 1: Feedback, strategies for multiple choice: stimulus based

Strategies for teaching visual literacy (Equity and Access solutions)

Developing Students’ Historical Thinking skills: Analyzing Historical Sources and Evidence: primary sources

Session 2: Analyzing Historical sources and evidence: secondary sources

Applying Source Analysis to the DBQ requirements

Session 3: Chronological Reasoning – Causation and CCOT

Short Answer Questions: types, scoring, strategies

Session 4: Score sample Short Answeressays

Period 1 strategies (participants share as well as instructor)

Syllabus development

DAY THREE

Session 1: Creating and Supporting a Historical Argument

Historical Connections – Comparison

Long Essay Question: rubric; developing effective thesis statements

Session 2: Score sample essays

Session 3: DBQ rubric and strategies

Contextualization

Practice DBQ prep

Session 4: Practice in Contextualization

Strategies for teaching Period 2 (participants share as well as instructor)

DAY FOUR

Session 1: AP Reading of essays (the official process); DBQ sample grading

Session 2: Construction of an effective essay

Session 3: Planning the course; Curricular requirements and Syllabus Development

August Resources

Session 4: Strategies for period 3 (participants share “Best Practices” as well as instructor)

DAY FIVE

Session 1: Strategies for Period 4

Session 2 — JULY 14-19

The workshop sessions are small, averaging fewer than 15 participants. Each session is designed to meet the needs of the individual participants to ensure that each teacher returns to the classroom with increased confidence and strategies for success.

The leaders are experienced AP teachers with outstanding reputations in public and private schools. All serve as readers at their respective AP readings and are endorsed by the College Board to lead AP workshops. Many of our consultants are table leaders and members of their respective course’s test development committee.

Art and Design

Instructor: Joann Winkler

AP Art and Design (formerly Studio Art)

The objective of this course is to provide both new and experienced AP® Art and Design teachers with an understanding of the requirements of the UPDATED course and portfolios. This course is designed to assist high school teachers of AP® Art and Design in understanding, planning, and teaching the course while assessing student progress. The goal is preparing students to successfully develop their portfolios. The rubrics for each section of the three portfolios will be reviewed and by the end of the session, teachers will be more effective in evaluating their students’ work and assisting them in achieving higher AP® scores.

An emphasis will be placed on ideation and strategies for assisting students in the selection of Sustained Investigation topics that are viable and inventive. Studio sessions will be dedicated to the development of a mini investigation, using action research, inquiry and exploration. Participants will engage in the same kind of creative problem solving that they will ask of their students.

The format of the Institute will include informal lectures, digital presentations and studio activities. All participants will be encouraged to share best practices and some exercises will be completed in small groups. Group critiques and activities will be conducted with an emphasis on process and the development of a theme or idea that can generate continued investigation. Participants should be prepared to share their innovative approaches with other workshop members. Museum experience will provide curriculum ideas and add strategies to enhancing student artwork.

Daily agenda will include, but is not limited to:

  1. An overview of The College Board UPDATEDportfolio materials and requirement
  2. Training materials from the 2019 Reading
  3. The Reading process

Participants can expect to:

  • Engage in inquiry and investigation through practice, experimentation, revision and reflection,
  • Investigate themes from Contemporary Art to inspire curriculum,
  • Collaborate with studio and seminar sessions structured to address the use of contemporary art practices,
  • Develop ideation for the Sustained Investigation that can support investigative research about an artistic concern,
  • Create art to support the research based inquiry into a mini investigation
  • Develop sketchbook and process strategies,
  • Select art for the Selected Works section,
  • Share strategies for portfolio development with hands-on approaches to work,
  • Review the UPDATED rubrics and use to score portfolios through mock readings
  • Museum or gallery exercises (subject to availability)

Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops, flash drives, sketchbooks, and favorite media to support art-makingin the 2D, 3D or Drawing portfolio. If possible bring utensils to cut and adhesives of choice in addition to collage making materials.

Biology

Instructor: Elizabeth Cowles

The “test drive” of the new AP Biology curriculum and examination is over, so it is time for a thorough assessment. We will perform the laboratories and alternatives. We’ll review the curriculum – from the Big Ideas to the learning objectives – and discuss new materials (texts, study guides.). We will explore how to make adjustments to the curriculum. Throughout the week, participants have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the course audit. We will discuss the 2017 exam results and best teaching practices to help our students succeed.

Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop, an inquiry-based laboratory or case study to share, and a willingness to exchange effective teaching practices/activities with peers in our group discussions.

Calculus AB

Instructor: Brendan Murphy

In this institute participants will experience a complete overview of the new AP Calculus AB curriculum frameworks with emphasis on appropriate use of graphing calculator, content and pacing, and global review for the AP exam. We will also review content and pedagogy in the following topics: related rates, area/volume, differential equations/slope fields, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, implicit differentiation, L’Hopital’s Rule and other topics. A special focus on assessment and motivation will help participants incorporate new strategies to build a successful AP Calculus program.Participants are asked to bring a graphing calculator.

Dear AP Calculus Participant:

Greetings and welcome to the St. Johnsbury AP Summer Institute. If you have never been to St. Johnsbury or Vermont you’re in for a treat!! I’m looking forward to meeting and working with you this summer, and I’m sure you’ll find the experience to be some of the best professional development you’ve ever participated in. I’m a high school math teacher in Bangor, Maine and ran a mentoring program for the Maine Department of Education for new(er) AP Statistics teachers for seven years. I’m an approved AP Calculus Reader and have run summer institutes in AP Calculus, AP Statistics, and Vertical Teams Math. I’ve also taught both AB and BC Calculus as virtual courses for the Maine DOE for the last ten years. I am currently on the AP Calculus Test Development Committee and we’ll talk in about what this committee does and how we put the exams together.

We will review all of the major topics covered under the AP Calculus AB curriculum, the AP Exam, resources, and classroom strategies. Starting in August 2019, the AB Calculus class has a new CED (Course and Exam Description) and we will review this in some detail during the week. Typically we will have a mix of teachers with different levels of experience, which just makes for a better week and classroom discussions. Since the AP Calculus Exam is about 33% calculator active, I will use the TI-83/84 as a teaching tool during the institute. I usually assign a small amount of homework each night, but want to make sure we have plenty of time for bocce and fun.

We will review released Multiple Choice and Free Response questions from the College Board as we review various calculus concepts. If you have a textbook that you will be using, feel free to bring it, if not do not worry about it. Please bring your graphing calculator if you have one, if not I usually bring a few extra calculators which you could borrow during the week. If you have a laptop I encourage you to bring this as well. If you are newer to the calculus you might want to do some review work before our session as this will make the week more enjoyable and productive for you.

The campus is beautiful, the food is excellent, and I am sure we’ll have a great week together. Do not worry if you have not taught the course before, we’ll have some fun and laugh a lot and of course do a lot of productive work during the week.

Feel free to contact me with any questions, concerns, or issues at brendankmurphy@yahoo.com. Good luck with rest of your school year, and I look forward to working with you in July. I’ll see you in Vermont this summer and thanks for selecting St. Johnsbury. Brendan Murphy

AP Calculus Institute

Overview

Monday, July 15

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, July 16

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, July 17

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 18

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Friday, July 19

8:00 a.m. – 12:00pm

Lunch will be provided each day for 30 minutes.

There will be a morning break with typical refreshments provided.

I will be available on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday nights for one hour (pending room availability) for extra help, one on one help, and/or calculator instruction.

Course Outline

This session is designed for beginning (new) as well as experienced AP Calculus teachers and will focus on the three major themes in calculus: Limits, Derivatives, and Integration. Strategies and pedagogy to effectively present the calculus concepts covered under the AB curriculum (CED) will be discussed. Using numerous Free Response questions, we will discuss the scoring rubrics and how the exam is scored/read. We will also discuss in detail the AP Calculus Exam and how these calculus topics are “tested.”


AP Calculus Institute

Outline

Title: AP Calculus AB

Goal: To help prepare beginning teachers to AP Calculus the skills to develop and present an effective AP Calculus class. For more experienced AP teachers, this institute will help you refine and improve upon your existing calculus skills.

Course Description: Over the course of this institute we will discuss:

1.Topics included in the AP curriculum (including some BC topics)

2.Calculator usage

3.Teaching styles/strategies

4.Various textbooks/publishers

5.Available resources for AP teachers

6.How to present various calculus concepts

7.The AP exam format

8.Scoring the AP exam

Instruction Types: Presentations, group discussions, small group work, individual presentations, problem-solving sets

Assignments: Participants are expected to participate daily according to their comfort level, “homework” will be given on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday nights, with individual presentations on Thursday or Friday as applicable.

Letter of Accommodation: If you need/want me to write a letter to your superintendent, principal or department head explaining the work you did during this institute, please just leave a name and address and I will gladly do this when I get back to school in the fall.

Calculators: The TI-83 (84) graphing calculator will be used extensively during the institute, participants should bring their own calculator. If you are unable to bring a calculator, let me know and I will bring you a “loaner” calculator for the week.


AP Calculus Institute

Daily Overview

Day 1: Monday, July 15

  • Problem of the Day
  • AP Calculus Overview (New CED)
  • Textbooks
  • Reform Movement
  • Limits
  • Derivatives
  • Homework

Day 2: Tuesday, July 16

  • Problem of the Day
  • Rate of Change
  • Implicit Differentiation
  • Related Rates
  • Applications of the Derivative
  • Riemann Sums
  • Homework

Day 3: Wednesday, July 17

  • Problem of the Day
  • Accumulation
  • Integration
  • Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (FTC)
  • Slope Fields
  • New CED

Day 4: Thursday, July 18

  • Problem of the Day
  • Transcendental Functions
  • Differential Equations
  • Area/Volume Problems
  • New CED

Day 5: Friday, July 19

  • BC Calculus Overview
  • Scoring Student Samples
  • College Board Rubrics
  • Scoring the AP Exam
  • Closing Activities
  • Evaluations

Calculus BC

Instructor: Vic Levine

This workshop will cover all of the BC curriculum, with an emphasis on infinite series, approximations, parametric relationships and concepts dealing with infinity. Participants will be solving AP free response and multiple choice questions, as well as learning how the free response questions are scored. We will discuss teaching strategies and investigate resources found on the Web. The recent curriculum re-write will be addressed, as well as any other issues that the participants want discussed.

Chemistry

Instructor: Michael Schwaab

Chemistry participants should be prepared for an intensive overview of the Advanced Placement Chemistry course with particular attention being paid to laboratory work, the structure and content of the AP examination and a number of key curricular areas. We will begin with a brief discussion of the general issues that all AP teachers grapple with including timetable variations, course outlines, resources and the development of a syllabus suitable for the College Board’s Course Audit. The development of the examination rubric, the setting of standards and the process of applying them to the AP examination will be explained by an experienced exam reader. Curricular areas unique to AP Chemistry will be linked to a large variety of previous examination questions. A series of one dozen different laboratory activities will be performed and discussed. Participants can expect an institute focused largely on the inquiry-based approach that is central to the AP Chemistry course. A collaborative approach will be used so come prepared to share favorite demonstrations, lab exercises and other best practices. Teachers will leave with a wealth of knowledge, a stack of textbooks and access to a load of internet-based resources.

Greetings,

I am eagerly anticipating working with you this summer at the AP chemistry summer institute in St Johnsbury. Our work will focus on the AP chemistry curriculum and how this is reflected in the exam. The curriculum for the AP chemistry program will appear differently starting in the 2019 – 2020 school year. While the new curriculum will continue to focus on the reasoning and inquiry skills that are essential for success at the college level, the course framework will follow a unit sequence that is more in line with textbook sequence and how most teachers currently teach the course. The curricular components (Learning Objectives, Essential Knowledge, Enduring Understandings and Science Practices) remain largely unchanged, but are realigned to the new sequence. Additionally, there are new resources available to AP teachers such as progress checks and a question bank that are designed to aid both students and teachers. We will examine and discuss what has changed and the new resources with an eye toward determining how each teacher may want to make use of the new curriculum and resources.

We will also perform a variety of different labs from most of the major topics. The labs will demonstrate the four levels of inquiry: confirmation,structured inquiry, guided inquiry, and open inquirywith the major focus being on guided inquiry. The practicality and fundamental concepts as well as the results and analysis will be discussed after each experiment. We will also examine the pedagogical and practical components of a strong and successful AP Chemistry program and discuss the challenges and triumphs we’ve had in our classrooms providing insight into what we do best. Our discussions will look toward incorporating new strategies that will strengthen your program. There will be time devoted to working on creating both multiple choice and free response questions that align with the learning objectives and science practices. Several sessions will be devoted to examining classroom approaches to inquiry where emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and analysis outside of the laboratory. We will discuss and practice activities that include formative assessment, group discussion, presentation, and prediction. If the group feels it is important, we will dedicate time to working on a syllabus that reflects the requirements of the course and prepares for the course audit.Most importantly, we will talk about any and all topics you wish to discuss. You should plan to bring a calculator, laptop, plenty of questions, and your expertise to share with the group. If you have materials you would like to distribute to the other participants, please send them to me electronically (mschaab@mma.edu) sometime before the institute or bring them with you and I will make copies for everyone.

Since we will be in a laboratory setting you should bring long pants and closed-toe shoes. Goggles will be provided, but you might prefer to bring your own pair.

I know you’ll contribute and learn a great deal from all that the institute and your colleagues have to offer. Bring your enthusiasm, your curiosity, and your appetite.

I am looking forward to working with you all. Please feel free to email or call (207-922-8812) if you have any questions or concerns.

Best Regards,

Mike

Chemistry Experienced Labs

Instructor: Marian DeWane

This year’s institute, designed for both new and experienced AP teachers, will provide an intensive five-day program that focuses on the experimental portion of our AP chemistry course. The institute will use guided-inquiry as well as traditional labs to explore a variety of experiments covering each of the six Big Ideas. We will also work out strategies for modifying traditional labs to make them more inquiry-based. The use of three major lab kit suppliers will allow you to evaluate the new guided inquiry lab kits and instructions from Flinn, Carolina, and Wards. Additionally, we will perform experiments from the new laboratory manual developed by the College Board. Some labs will be computer-based using a variety of probes such as pH, colorimetry, and temperature. Participants will work in small groups to perform the labs and then compare results, troubleshoot problems for students, and develop plans to integrate labs into your curriculum. Many of the lab experiments will be followed by in-depth analysis and conclusion discussions. This will allow us to develop and model critical-thinking skills that can be used in the classroom so that inquiry becomes an integrated component of our entire course. Using a dynamic approach in the classroom, participants will experience firsthand how to create a community of scientists, vastly decrease the amount of time, and increase the effectiveness of, their lab grading. The institute will look at how the new curriculum affects the laboratory program. We will examine lab problems from recent AP Exams as well as develop laboratory questions for our own exams. We will also discuss strategies that help prepare students for success on the exam.

Additionally, we will examine the College Board’s access and equity initiatives and the extensive supporting resources available to AP teachers. Most importantly, the institute will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and teaching practices where you will be able to add to and gain from the success and experience of other AP teachers. Many, if not all, of this year’s labs will be different from labs covered in the previous two years so everyone will leave the institute with a list of new labs and ideas that you will want to use in your classrooms and laboratories. As in past St. Johnsbury APSI’s, the week will serve as a springboard for the development of a network of collaborating AP Chemistry teachers. Come for a week of experimentation and collaboration with colleagues from the entire region.

English Topic Course: Critical Reading and Excellent Writing with David Jolliffe

Instructor: David Jolliffe

Critical Reading and Excellent Writing: Developing English Courses that Challenge Students

This four-day workshop will engage participants in active, hands-on, classroom-oriented work focusing on the following goals:

  • Teaching students a template they can use to do close, critical readings of all types of texts: literary, “ordinary,” and visual
  • Fostering forceful and effective writing, with an emphasis on clarity and detail
  • Developing practices of “conversing” with source materials in documented argumentative texts
  • Articulating English instruction with two activities that good students are often interested in: the performing arts and athletics

Participants will leave the workshop equipped with a rich array of lessons, units, and activities that will effectively and appropriately challenge students throughout all the years of secondary school.

English Language

Instructor: Peter Durnan

Over the course of the week we will fully review the AP English Language and Composition curriculum and exam. Participants will review and practice skills of argumentation and rhetorical analysis and share best practices. We will be visited by a guest writer and take advantage of local art to augment the experience. The week is intended to address the practice of inexperienced and experienced teachers.

English Literature

Instructor: Robert Brown

Participants in this workshop will begin with a broad overview of AP English Literature curricula, and will proceed to examine effective strategies for teaching students to read and respond to each of the major literary genres. Examples of both familiar canonical texts and works by emerging writers will provide platforms for discussion and collaboration, as participants experience and develop teaching methods and materials.

Rather than focus on teaching “to” the AP examination, the workshop will encourage participants to teach “with” it. Participants will collaborate in creating appropriate assignments and assessments that mirror the AP exam, and will practice applying the standards used by AP readers in evaluating and scoring student writing.

Even though the workshop is devoted to Advanced Placement, participants will find that its approaches and materials are readily adaptable to all levels.

Environmental Science

Instructor: Andrew Milbauer

Combining discussion of the AP Environmental Science curriculum and the grading of its AP Exam with work in the lab and field, this intensive workshop for rookie and veteran teachers fully prepares you for teaching APES. St. Johnsbury is an ideal location for this workshop, since there are a number of interesting field trips nearby, including a wood chip electrical generating plant, a wind farm, a state-of-the-art sewer plant, and interesting sites for a soil workshop. We use St. J’s modern computer lab. Importantly, there will also be ample opportunity to exchange ideas and best practices. Additional emphasis will explore diverse perspectives on complex issues. Finally, instruction offers insight in ways to increase student self reflection while reducing the workload for AP teachers.

European History

Instructor: James Kirkcaldy

This will be an intensive five-day workshop for new and experienced teachers of AP European History. The workshop will emphasize teaching strategies and activities that are especially designed for use in a tightly paced AP course. We will concentrate on pacing, core concepts, recent historiography, alternative assessments, and the grading rubric for the A.P. exam. Participants will also receive a 300 page AP European History Workbook prepared by the instructor, plus over 200 powerpoint presentations (each with a worksheet) that have been especially created for students to use at home in order to give teachers the option to “flip” their classroom allowing for more student centered learning in the class. Participants will also receive hundreds of activities, supplementary readings and visuals suitable for AP instruction. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to share lessons and activities with their colleagues. The workshop is designed to be an enjoyable sharing experience that will give participants the confidence and ability to affectively teach a great course.

Math Topic Course: Pre-Calculus for Middle School and High School Teachers with Eliel Gonzalez

Instructor: Eliel Gonzalez

Audience: Teachers in grades 6 - 12. Others with the permission of the instructor.

This week long course offers an intensive and fast-paced review of all content in the standard Pre-Calculus high school curriculum with emphasis on lesson planning, appropriate materials, graphing calculators, effective instructional methods and SAT/ACT connections. This course is designed specifically for teachers who desire direct instruction in all Pre-Calculus concepts and topics from a mathematical, curriculum, and instructional perspective. Topics include functions and their graphs; polynomial and rational functions; conics; trigonometry, and sequences and series. Each participant needs to bring a graphing calculator to class each day. A TI-83/TI-84 is suggested.

TEXTBOOK: (provided): Larson, Precalculus, 7th Ed.

Physics I

Instructor: Joe Mancino

In this week-long institute we will be covering all of the essentials needed to teach AP Physics 1 including the Curriculum Frameworks, Course Audits, and Exams.

A significant portion of the week will focus on Inquiry Based Learning and establishing an AP Physics experience that maximizes student learning. Numerous practical tips will be provided throughout the week on teaching strategies, demonstrations, audiovisuals, computer-based learning opportunities and teaching resources. Participants will have opportunities throughout the week to ask questions and to share their own strategies and approaches with other participants.

The week will also include significant content reinforcement. Topics addressed will include content that is new to the AP program, selected traditional areas that are especially problematic, as well as any other topics requested by participants. A number of experiments will be discussed and a selection of labs will be conducted by participants.

Participants are asked to bring the following to the institute:

— a calculator and laptop

— one or two Physics demonstrations to perform for the group during the week

— a written summary of a lab suitable for use in AP physics. This lab will not be conducted during the institute, but each participant will briefly present it to the group. If the lab has handouts, they should also be provided.

Physics II

Instructor: Barry Panas

This workshop will focus on physics topics to be tested in the Physics 2 which include more on electric circuits including capacitors, electrostatics, magnetic fields, electromagnetism, physical and geometric optics, fluids, thermodynamics with kinetic theory, PV diagrams and probability, and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.

Psychology

Instructor: Lori Hodin

This hands-on workshop will provide participants with an overview of the structure and content of an AP Psychology course. Participants will analyze past AP exams and participate in a simulated AP reading to evaluate student writing. Interactive demonstrations, online resources and discussions will provide participants with opportunities to learn about how to integrate new research in psychology into their teaching.

This workshop is updated to address the College Board's changes to the AP Psychology Course and Exam Description (CED). Key changes in the AP Psychology exam include: organizing the course into 9 units instead of 14, learning targets and skills specified in the CED and FRQs will always be 7 points. I will also share new resources and supports from the College Board.

This session is open to teachers with all levels of experience.



Spanish Literature

Instructor: Patricia Smith

In May of 2014, the AP Spanish Language Exam was adapted to include culture. This course will address the redesign of the exam, and train experienced and new AP teachers to prepare their students for the exam. Teachers are encouraged to go to this web site to read more about the new course; http://advancesinap.collegeboard.org. All AP Spanish Language and Culture teachers need to submit a syllabus directed to this exam. Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit.

We will discuss how to teach for improvement in interpretive communication, and will spend considerable time reviewing strategies for interpersonal writing and speaking, and presentational writing and speaking. Much practice in the workshop will be directed towards the teaching of cultural comparisons, and in activities to strengthen the students’ awareness of cultural diversity.

Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit. Patricia Smith is an experienced Spanish Language Consultant who will guide you throughout the week as you prepare this syllabus. Topics to be discussed during the week will include:

Course Description, Planning and Pacing Guide for Course
Standards for Foreign Language Learning
AP Spanish Language and Culture Practice Exam
Three modes of communication
Emphasis on cultures of Spanish-speaking world
Analysis of the six themes on which the course is based
Curriculum framework and learning objectives
Strategies of teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing
Cooperative learning
Becoming an AP Reader
AP Equity and Access
Differentiated instruction

May, 2019

Dear Spanish AP Literature and Culture Institute Participant:

I am very much looking forward to our week together. We will be talking about how to set up a successful AP Spanish Literature and Culture program, and/or how to expand upon an existing one. Please email me in Spanish once you get this letter: patricia.t.smith@comcast.net. Please introduce yourself, describe your school and your classes, and tell me what you hope to get out of this course. By the end of the Institute, you will have a very good understanding of exactly what makes up the AP exam, what is expected of the students, and how the exam is graded. You will be receiving many handouts, as well as a useful manual from the College Board.

We will all be sharing ideas, and I ask that you bring with you the textbooks you are using. Please bring with you any essays or CDs of your own students, with the names removed. You can also bring videos or DVDs of student projects or skits, if you would like to share them and get feedback.

Please read all the materials currently available on AP Central about the AP Spanish Literature and Culture Exam. Please also read the course description at this site: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/3500.html?excmpid=MTG243-PR-33-cd

Please study the list of required readings for the course. Choose two that you have not recently read, and plan to present to the workshop on Friday a plan for how you would present and evaluate these works.

We will be working on the development of unit guides. Therefore, please bring a copy of your school calendar. You will give me a preliminary copy of this guide at the end of the week. Whatever you create, the idea is that it will be something you NEED and something you will USE. The wonderful thing about a week-long Institute is the opportunity to work together with colleagues, and get feedback from me and from them. We all know that during the school year there is never time for this!

In addition to this, please review the reading list and be sure you are familiar with all the texts, in particular, the new ones. We will be discussing these during the week. You need to concentrate on Cortés: “Segunda carta de relación”, Portilla, “Visión de los vencidos”, José Martí, “Nuestra América”, and Dario, “A Roosevelt.”

A little about me: I have a BA in Spanish and French from St. Lawrence University. I taught at the secondary level from 1970-2002, with 14 years teaching AP Spanish Language. Most of the time I was at Braintree High School, south of Boston. I am now teaching at the college level, at Suffolk and Tufts Universities. My masters is in Spanish Language, from Middlebury. I have an additional M.Ed in Special Education from Bridgewater State College, Massachusetts. I have been an AP Reader since 1987, of both literature and language exams. I have also served as a Table Leader for the AP Spanish Literature and Culture exam. Finally, I have been conducting workshops for the College Board since 2001.

One final request: Make a list of all your thoughts and ideas as you peruse the materials on AP Central, and come prepared for a week of immersion in Spanish, with an opportunity for new friendships and sharing.

No veo la hora de conocerles.

Hasta pronto,

Patricia Smith

Statistics

Instructor: Laura Marshall

The objectives of this weeklong workshop are straightforward: to help our participants do a better job teaching AP Statistics and to improve their students’ scores on the AP Exam.

We will examine the College Board’s outline of topics and course philosophy, discuss the course expectations, and share strategies for success on the AP exam. Additionally, we will review and clarify important concepts in Statistics and provide guidance and answer questions about the subject matter. We will also explore pedagogy, looking at sample lessons, classroom activities, effective demos, and possibilities for projects. Finally, we’ll look at a variety of resources, including textbooks, calculators, videos, software, and other materials.

Whether you are new to AP Statistics or a veteran educator, you’ll come away with lots of valuable insights (and have fun, too)!

US Government and Politics

Instructor: Rachel Ryan

This course is being offered for the new and experienced teacher of US Government and Politics who wants to learn about the redesign of the course that went into effect for the 2018-2019 school year. This workshop will also cover the entire scope and curriculum for the course. Participants will come away from the workshop with an understanding of the content of the course, how to pace the course and how to design assessments to maximize learning and AP exam preparation. We will have time to work on course syllabi to fulfill the College Board audit. Best practices and assessments will be provided and shared and at the end of the week all participants will be able to return to their classrooms with new skills, content and assessments prepared and ready to implement. I will also weave quite a few technological resources into the course that can be used but both student and teacher.

Dear Participant,

I am so pleased that you have signed up to take my workshop on the new AP US Government and Politics exam. This is an exciting year to be teaching the course and taking the workshop as the course and the exam have just completed the first year with the redesign. My goal for this workshop is to help you feel comfortable with and excited about the new curriculum framework.

Please fill out this Google form if you are coming the week of July 7th and this Google form if you are coming the week of July 14th so I can find out more about you and make sure I answer any questions that you have going into the workshop. I took the AP US Government and Politics course and exam the first year it was offered in 1987-88. I have been teaching the course since the mid-1990s and have been an AP exam reader since 2006. I have had extensive training in the new curriculum framework and I have a plethora of resources, lessons and assignments and assessments to share with you. You will leave my workshop with a whole series of takeaways that will enable you to successfully teach the new course.

One of the best things about workshops for teachers, is we all learn from each other so be prepared to share your best practices, ask great questions and absorb what everyone else is bringing to the class. Feel free to bring in assessments and activities that work and even don’t work as we can learn from those as well. Bring your textbook and other resources worth sharing. I will set up a shared Google folder that will enable us to share information easily.

Along with your textbook, also bring your school calendar and any curriculum requirements so we can begin to work on our syllabi for the AP Audit. II am looking forward to meeting you this summer.

Sincerely,

Rachael A. Ryan

The Taft School

ryanr@taftschool.org

US History

Instructor: Tracey Wilson

This workshop is designed for both new and experienced teachers and will focus on the recently redesigned AP US History course and exam. The new curriculum framework establishes a specific set of historical thinking skills and thematic learning objectives which helps teachers organize the content starting in 1491 and ending in the present. The workshop will explore best practices for bringing together skills, themes, and content in the classroom and will provide opportunities for participants to work with peers, share ideas, lessons, and best practices. Teachers will learn how they have more freedom to develop courses that challenge their students in their schools.

Teachers will wrestle with how to teach the best US History college level survey course they can teach through addressing compelling questions, primary sources, the course syllabus, and running classroom discussions.

World History

Instructor: Lenore Schneider

The AP World History workshop is designed to help both new and experienced teachers and will focus on recent changes to the AP World History Exam. The instructor, who has taught the course for sixeen years and has been a Table Leader at the Reading for many years, will address some of the key challenges of the course: coverage of the content in the new Curriculum Framework, pacing, development of critical thinking skills, success on the test questions, and stimulating student engagement. Participants will examine the Multiple Choice questions, Short Answer Questions, the Document Based Essay and the Long Essay Question in terms of strategies to succeed on the new test. They will examine the College Board scoring rubrics and will utilize them to analyze sample student exam essays. The workshop is interactive so that teachers can replicate the activities in their own classrooms. Participants are also encouraged to bring some of their best practices (lessons, resources, unit plans, books, films, and/or syllabi) for sharing and discussion with the group. The instructor will provide a thumb drive of hundreds of files, including Power Point presentations, assignments, tests, projects, performance assessments, and teaching strategies. Most of the strategies are also applicable in regular section world history classes.

Session 3 — JULY 21-26

The workshop sessions are small, averaging fewer than 15 participants. Each session is designed to meet the needs of the individual participants to ensure that each teacher returns to the classroom with increased confidence and strategies for success.

The leaders are experienced AP teachers with outstanding reputations in public and private schools. All serve as readers at their respective AP readings and are endorsed by the College Board to lead AP workshops. Many of our consultants are table leaders and members of their respective course’s test development committee.

Advanced Art and Design

Instructor: Joann Winkler

Experienced (Advanced) AP Art and Design (formerly Studio Art)

The objective of this course is to provide both experienced AP® Studio Art teachers with an understanding of the requirements of the UPDATED course and portfolios. This course is designed to assist high school teachers of AP® Art and Design in understanding, planning, and teaching the course while assessing student progress. The goal is preparing students to successfully develop their portfolios. The rubrics for each section of the three portfolios will be reviewed and by the end of the session, teachers will be more effective in evaluating their students’ work and assisting them in achieving higher AP® scores.

An emphasis will be placed on ideation and strategies for assisting students in the selection of Sustained Investigation topics that are viable and inventive. Studio sessions will be dedicated to the development of a mini investigation, using action research, inquiry and exploration. Participants will engage in the same kind of creative problem solving that they will ask of their students.

The format of the Institute will include informal lectures, digital presentations and studio activities. All participants will be encouraged to share best practices and some exercises will be completed in small groups. Group critiques and activities will be conducted with an emphasis on process and the development of a theme or idea that can generate continued investigation. Participants should be prepared to share their innovative approaches with other workshop members.

This workshop will provide you with some of the tools and techniques for helping students acquire the skills needed to excel in AP Art and Design. You will review materials, course outlines, content-related handouts, student samples, and scoring guidelines that focus on pedagogical techniques and content-specific strategies that you can use in the classroom. You’ll also learn about completing the digital activation process at the start of the school year that will help your students register for AP portfolio submission.

Daily agenda will include, but is not limited to:

  1. An overview of The College Board UPDATEDportfolio materials and requirements
  2. Training materials from the 2019 Reading
  3. The Reading process

Participants can expect to:

  • Engage in inquiry and investigation through practice, experimentation, revision and reflection,
  • Investigate themes from Contemporary Art to inspire curriculum,
  • Collaborate with studio and seminar sessions structured to address the use of contemporary art practices,
  • Develop ideation for the Sustained Investigation that can support investigative research about an artistic concern,
  • Create art to support the research based inquiry into a mini investigation
  • Develop sketchbook and process strategies,
  • Select art for the Selected Works section,
  • Share strategies for portfolio development with hands-on approaches to work,
  • Review the UPDATED rubrics and use to score portfolios through mock readings

Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops, flash drives, sketchbooks, and favorite media to support art-makingin the 2D, 3D or Drawing portfolio. If possible bring utensils to cut and adhesives of choice in addition to collage making materials.

After attending this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Align your instruction with the goals of the AP Art and Design course(s).
  2. Identify the skills and knowledge that the portfolio will assess, and identify the tasks and materials with which students might need more preparation.
  3. Design a course that meets the curricular requirements.
  4. Make equitable access a guiding principle in designing instruction.

Art History

Instructor: Yu Bong Ko

This course will focus on preparing and teaching the redesigned AP Art History curriculum, while reflecting on the lessons learned and anticipating the road ahead for maximizing student success. Topics include: balancing depth of knowledge and breadth in content coverage for better pacing of the course; improving student’s critical thinking, reading, writing, and note-taking skills; demystifying the AP exam scoring and accessing good practice questions; creating a learner active and fun classroom; obtaining the best resources for teaching individual works of art in the 10 course content areas; incorporating technology infused and multimedia classroom; revising the course syllabus (and submitting one for the AP audit, too).

For 2019-20, there are significant updates to the Curriculum and Exam Description (CED), including digital access to new resources. All participants can expect to acquire new and insightful ideas and model best teaching practices to immediately promote active student-centered learning in the classroom, including ways to enhance visual literacy: how to help students develop skills in looking at, thinking about and communicating ideas about works of art. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop to receive and work with valuable handouts that are in electronic format, such as on a flash drive.

Welcome to St. Johnsbury Academy’s AP Art History session, 2019!

This course will focus on preparing and teaching the redesigned AP Art History curriculum, while reflecting on the lessons learned and anticipating the road ahead for maximizing student success. Whether you are experienced or new to teaching the course, this year’s summer institute strives to help you make a even better transition to the redesigned course and continue to build on the successful teaching and learning experiences.

As you know, AP Art History has been updated for the 2019-20 school year:

• Updated Course and Exam Description (CED) is now more clearly presented and organizes AP Art History into 10 commonly taught units – 1 for each of the 10 content areas

• Updated course framework defines skills and specific learning objectives for students and how each learning objectives is tied to specific enduring understandings and essential knowledge statements

• Throughout the CED, there are suggestions for pairing content with skills and throughout the course framework, students will know how course content and skills will be assessed on the exam

• Exam Updates: starting in the 2019-20 school year, there will be changes to the free response section that now includes use of a stable analytic rubric, as well as tasks that will be more tightly defined for students. In addition, starting in August 2019-20, teachers will complete a digital activation process to access the new resources:

• “AP Classroom” is a dedicated online platform designed to support the teacher and students throughout the AP experience.

• Unit Guides: will suggest sequence and pacing of content, scaffold skill instruction across units, and provide tips on taking the exam.

• Personal Progress Check: these formative AP questions for each unit will give students feedback on the areas they need to focus, measuring knowledge and skills through multiple-choice and freeresponse questions.

• Progress Dashboard: will allow teachers to review individual student and class progress throughout the year. Students will be able to view their own progress over time to improve performance.

• AP Question Bank: an online library of real AP Exam questions indexed by course topic and skills. Teachers can create customized tests that can be assigned online or on paper. I will be sharing with you my personal collection and treasure trove of updated resources to each of the 250 works of art in the curriculum. We will also examine multimedia enriched resources, learn basic art historical and research methods, and explore ways to teach architecture, while making art history relevant to students as a course in high school.

Throughout the week, participants will learn to work with effective studentcentered tools such as sketchbooks, interactive notebooks and even taking notes by hand. Most significantly, instead of focusing on memorization of isolated facts about works of art, artists, or cultures, this workshop will advocate an approach that involves placing the 250 works within their historical context and illuminating thematic relationships and making cross-cultural connections among them. Among the many advantages of attending a summer institute are the opportunities to make personal contacts and to share teaching methodologies with one another. Critical to this aim is advanced preparation on behalf of the participants. All of us attending this year’s summer institute are strongly encouraged to explore the detailed explanation of AP Art History updates for 2019-20, available on the College Board’s “AP Central” website, including preordering the new CED. (copy and paste the link below):

https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-art-...

https://www.collegeboard.org/CED

For this summer’s institute please do the following ahead of time:

• Bring a laptop (and extension chord) in order to download materials, take notes, and check out online resources. You will be receiving tons of valuable electronic files from me. Please be sure to free up at least 100 (one hundred) gigabytes of storage space on your computer’s hard-drive.

• If possible, have installed on your laptop MS Office PowerPoint 2011 or better; for Mac users, Keynote 2012 or better.

• Leave extra room in your baggage for materials, especially complementary textbooks (hopefully) and College Board workshop binder received at the institute.

• Familiarize yourself with file sharing programs such as Dropbox, Google Drive, etc., so that time spent copying files can be kept to a minimum.

• Recommended: purchase a new (virus free) flash-drive or portable back-up storage unit (at least 128 GB) for ease in transferring large electronic files, especially if you are short on the computer’s hard-drive capacity.

• Most importantly, go to the College Board “AP Central” website and take time to explore all of the official College Board material and updates to the newly redesigned curriculum. Doing this in advance will save us a lot of time during the week (copy and paste the link below): https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-art-...

• Lastly, join the AP Art History Teacher Community. All you need is an email address and answering a few questions about you. You will be connected to colleagues throughout the country and you will be glad that you did (copy and paste the link below):

https://apcommunity.collegeboard.org

Lead Consultant/Instructor: Yu Bong Ko

If you have questions relating specifically to the AP Art History session content, please write me at: yubongko@gmail.com OR yubong.ko@dc.edu

Biology Experienced Labs

Instructor: Elizabeth Cowles

This course is designed for experienced teachers. We’ll do new experiments and techniques which cover the learning objectives and explore some of best instructional tools. We shall learn the differences between a prediction and a hypothesis and how to choose the most appropriate statistical test. We will review the AP® Biology labs and how statistics are used in each. We will discuss the 2018 exam results and its “take home” lessons. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop, a favorite case study or an inquiry-based laboratory to share, and a desire to learn (and to have fun!)

Calculus AB

Instructor: Eliel Gonzalez

In this institute participants will experience a complete overview of the new AP Calculus AB curriculum frameworks with emphasis on appropriate use of graphing calculator, content and pacing, and global review for the AP exam. We will also review content and pedagogy in the following topics: related rates, area/volume, differential equations/slope fields, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, implicit differentiation, L’Hopital’s Rule and other topics. A special focus on assessment and motivation will help participants incorporate new strategies to build a successful AP Calculus program.Participants are asked to bring a graphing calculator.

Chemistry

Instructor: Marian DeWane

Chemistry participants should be prepared for an intensive overview of the Advanced Placement Chemistry course with particular attention being paid to laboratory work, the structure and content of the AP examination and a number of key curricular areas. We will begin with a brief discussion of the general issues that all AP teachers grapple with including timetable variations, course outlines, resources and the development of a syllabus suitable for the College Board’s Course Audit. The development of the examination rubric, the setting of standards and the process of applying them to the AP examination will be explained by an experienced exam reader. Curricular areas unique to AP Chemistry will be linked to a large variety of previous examination questions. A series of one dozen different laboratory activities will be performed and discussed. Participants can expect an institute focused largely on the inquiry-based approach that is central to the AP Chemistry course. A collaborative approach will be used so come prepared to share favorite demonstrations, lab exercises and other best practices. Teachers will leave with a wealth of knowledge, a stack of textbooks and access to a load of internet-based resources

Computer Science Principles

Instructor: Jacqueline Corricelli

This workshop is designed for beginning (new) as well as experienced teachers to introduce you to College Board’s newest computer science course called AP CS Principles. This course is a broad introduction to computer science designed to improve access for all students. We will focus on the 7 Big Ideas for this course: Creativity, Abstraction, Data and Information, Algorithms, Programming, The Internet, and Global Impact. We will emphasize specific teaching strategies to accomplish each of these tasks in a diverse learning environment and how to recruit students to ensure diversity. We will discuss in detail the structure of the AP CS Principles Assessment including the two Performance Tasks (administered throughout the school year) and the Multiple Choice exam. Scoring rubrics will be utilized. We will use various sites to explore computer science, organize workshop materials, and to collaborate throughout this week.

English Language

Instructor: Peter Durnan

Over the course of the week we will fully review the AP English Language and Composition curriculum and exam. Participants will review and practice skills of argumentation and rhetorical analysis and share best practices. We will be visited by a guest writer and take advantage of local art to augment the experience. The week is intended to address the practice of inexperienced and experienced teachers.

English Literature

Instructor: Richard McCarthy

Participants in this workshop will begin with a broad overview of AP English Literature curricula, and will proceed to examine effective strategies for teaching students to read and respond to each of the major literary genres. Examples of both familiar canonical texts and works by emerging writers will provide platforms for discussion and collaboration, as participants experience and develop teaching methods and materials.

Rather than focus on teaching “to” the AP examination, the workshop will encourage participants to teach “with” it. Participants will collaborate in creating appropriate assignments and assessments that mirror the AP exam, and will practice applying the standards used by AP readers in evaluating and scoring student writing.

Even though the workshop is devoted to Advanced Placement, participants will find that its approaches and materials are readily adaptable to all levels.

Environmental Science

Instructor: Andrew Milbauer

Combining discussion of the AP Environmental Science curriculum and the grading of its AP Exam with work in the lab and field, this intensive workshop for rookie and veteran teachers fully prepares you for teaching APES. St. Johnsbury is an ideal location for this workshop, since there are a number of interesting field trips nearby, including a wood chip electrical generating plant, a wind farm, a state-of-the-art sewer plant, and interesting sites for a soil workshop. We use St. J’s modern computer lab. Importantly, there will also be ample opportunity to exchange ideas and best practices. Additional emphasis will explore diverse perspectives on complex issues. Finally, instruction offers insight in ways to increase student self reflection while reducing the workload for AP teachers.

History Topic Course: Teaching with Digital History with John Rosinbum

Instructor: John Rosinbum

Teaching with Digital History

Based off his popular series “Teaching w/#DigHist”, high school and college instructor John Rosinbum will discuss the various reasons and ways that high school teachers can integrate digital history into the classroom. In the past two decades, historians have entered the digital age, designing a host of exciting projects that use technology to better understand, analyze, and visualize the past. These projects offer outstanding avenues teachers to engage their students in the study of the past while building digital literacy. This workshop will examine a wide range of digital projects on subjects that examine American history from many different perspectives, creating concrete strategies and lesson plans for how they can be used in the classroom.

During the workshop participants will:
    Create a best practices sheet for teaching with digital history
  • Explore ways to teach the transatlantic slave trade using the Voyages database
  • Devise an activity revolving around Gapminder and Continuities and Changes
  • Build lesson plans centered around digitized copies of 19thcentury newspapers
  • Develop strategies to better integrate indigenous history throughout the year using digital sources
  • Collaborate with fellow participants on digital history projects
  • Identify a project of their choice and build a lesson plan

At the conclusion of the workshop participants will:
  • Understand the basics of the digital turn in American history
  • Possess a better knowledge of the types of digital history projects and how to find them
  • Leave with classroom-ready lesson plans, units and activities
  • Obtain 30 hrs Continuing Education Units

History Topics Course: Teaching with Digital History

St. Johnsbury, VT July 22-26, 2019

John Rosinbum, Facilitator

John.Rosinbum@gmail.com

Dear Participants,

Hello! My name is John Rosinbum, and I’ll be the facilitator for the St. Johnsbury’s special topics course on teaching with digital history. As way of introduction, I am a high school US history teacher, founding author of the American Historical Association’s (AHA) Teaching w/#DigHist series, co-chair of the AP Research Development Committee, and the lead consultant for the AP Research program. In 2014 I got involved with the AHA’s emerging digital history focus group. Since then I’ve worked on ways to make the exciting work done by historians in digital history both accessible and pedagogically valuable to K-12 educators. I’m delighted at the opportunity to spend a week discussing digital history, examining a host of exciting projects, collaborating on ways to best use digital history in the classroom, and sharing best practices in history education. I have included a brief outline of the week’s activities below. Of course, those activities are subject to change based on your feedback!

As you get ready for the training, please fill out the following survey (link). This will help me tailor the course to your interests and learning goals. Digital history is an exciting field that encompasses all fields and eras of American history. If the group wishes, we could even look beyond US history and think about digital history in other areas. In addition, digital history is best used when grounded in both historical and skill-based content. This training is truly a collaborative exercise that functions best when we work together.

Prior to arriving, please be sure that you have packed a laptop and a copy of your school’s calendar. We will be working with a lot of material and almost all of it will be digital. I will make a bevy of classroom-ready resources available via Google Drive.

Finally, I want to reiterate how deeply I value your time at these workshops, and will do my utmost to ensure that it is used wisely. I appreciate feedback and am willing to adapt the training to participant needs as the week progresses. Please let me know if you have any questions, special requests or comments before, during and after the training. I appreciate the continued exchange of ideas and questions after the workshop is over. My email is john.rosinbum@gmail.com.

I look forward to meeting and getting to know you all!

Best,

John Rosinbum


Outline: July 22-26

Monday:

Focus: Weekly Overview, Introduction to Digital History, First Digital History Project, Collaborative Planning

Agenda Items:

Introduction

What is Digital History?

What does it mean to teach with digital history?

Best Practices in Teaching Digital History

First Digital History Project: Gapminder (Database/Visualization)

Collaborative Lesson Plan: American Panorama (Visualizations/Mapping)

Debrief

Tuesday

Focus: Using Digital History in the Classroom, Second Digital History Project, Grounding Digital History (Content), Building In-class and Out of Class Activities with Digital Archives

Agenda Items:

Best Practices Review

American Panorama Wrap-Up

Second Digital History Project: Voyages (Database and Visualization)

Grounding Digital History (Historical Content: Participant Choice)

Using Digital Archives: Viral Texts/American Memory (Newspapers)

Activity Building

Debrief

Wednesday

Focus: Using Digital History as a Summative Activity, Third Digital History Project, Grounding Digital History (Skill), Searching and Finding Digital History Projects

Agenda Items:

Activity Building Wrap-Up

Web Publishing and Omeka

Third Digital History Project: Colored Conventions (Exhibits)

Grounding Digital History (Skill: Participant Choice)

Finding Your Own Digital History Project

Lesson Planning

Debrief


Thursday

Focus: Grounding Digital History, Fourth Digital History Project, Combining Digital History, Interworkshop Collaboration

Agenda Items:

Finding Your Own Digital History Project Wrap-Up

Fourth Digital History Project: Clio (Mapping)

Combining Digital History (Indigenous History)

Interworkshop Collaboration

Debrief

Friday

Focus: Fifth Digital History Project, Activity Share, Week in Review

Agenda Items:

Fifth Digital History Project (Participants Choice)

Assignments Charrette

Best Practices Review

Surveys


--


John Rosinbum
@johnrosinbum
PhD, North American History

Physics C

Instructor: Gardner Friedlander

Gardner Friedlander earned a BA at Princeton, majoring in Physics and Philosophy. He introduced AP* Physics C to his school and taught it for almost 30 years (as well as teaching physics at four other levels.) He was an AP* Physics reader for most years from 1998 to 2016 and served on the AP* Physics Development Committee for two years and on the AP* Physics C Development Committee when the B and C courses were split off. He has taught physics in three different states, finishing with 33 years at University School of Milwaukee, an independent coed day school in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Overview: AP Physics C is a year-long calculus-based physics course equivalent to a typical introductory university course for scientists or engineers. The College Board recommends that this course not be a first-year course in physics, but in recognition of differing demands at different schools, the exam is broken into two 90 minute parts—Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism. Thus if students have had no physics prior to this course, they can take a full year covering just Mechanics (with a full year of Electricity and Magnetism the following year.) If they have had a good prior exposure to physics, then both halves can be taken in a single year.

This institute is designed to assist teachers using either model. Participants will have the chance to engage with other teachers who teach courses similar to their own, work on pacing and syllabus development, and design and execute laboratory and demonstration activities for use in their own classrooms, with participants encouraged to share their own ideas for demonstrations and best practices. The new College Board resources for Physics C will be examined (along with other changes in the Advanced Placement program such as the earlier registration needed.) Participants will also leave the institute with access to almost 50 years of past exams and solutions (a larger data base than the one used in the College Board new resources.) Emphasis will be placed on teaching problem solving techniques and approaches to teaching AP Physics C with an emphasis on encouraging higher order thinking skills and remediating student misconceptions. Participants will often work in small groups to allow them to choose the activities and portions of the course that best fit their needs. For each course (Mechanics and E&M) as appropriate, the presenter will familiarize participants with the whole framework for the curriculum, with emphasis on the portions that have proved most difficult for students in the past. The following is a preliminary outline of the week, although it may easily change based on participants’ wishes.

Day 1 (Monday 7/22)

• Introductions of presenter, participants, supplied materials, and the course(s)

• Dramatic changes in AP and less dramatic changes in AP Physics C

• Particular challenges in teaching AP Physics C

• Small group examinations of the Course Objectives (Mech.) in the new course material.

• Whole group work with some sample Free Response items (Mech.)

• Small group preparation of 2019 Free Response answers (Mech. and/or E&M)

• Discuss a plan for preparation of individual course syllabi and (eventually) for the Audit

Day 2

• Presentation of solutions to 2019 FR questions

• Whole group discussion of the process of scoring AP Exams with the 2019 Mech. exam as a model

• Whole and small group discussion of how to implement AP-level problems into a high school AP course, with an emphasis on the new College Board material.

• Whole group consideration of what makes AP Physics C laboratory experience different from a typical HS course. What should lab reports look like? How are they evaluated and made into a portfolio?

• Small group experiment work #1

• Choice of

-- Small group work on some of the Mech. problems student have found most difficult in this millennium

-- Recognition of the different approach of the E&M course. Small group examination of the E&M Course Objectives and the 2019 E&M exam.

Day 3

• Whole group discussion of when and how calculus should be introduced in different school situations

• Presenting Rotation, historically the hardest area in Mech. for students to understand

• “Best Practice” presentations by participants

• Individual and small group examination of MC questions

• Small group experiment work #2

• Choice of Mech. or E&M small group work on some of the problems student have found most difficult in this millennium

Day 4

• Online resources: presentation and examination

• “Best Practice” presentations by participants

• Small group experiment work #3

• Develop a summary of ideas for implementation of a laboratory plan that includes both classic equipment and adding new technology, all while laddering different levels of student inquiry

• Laboratory notebook and syllabus (and/or completed problem records) due from credit participants

Workshop conclusion and evaluation

Spanish Language and Culture

Instructor: Patricia Smith

In May of 2014, the AP Spanish Language Exam was adapted to include culture. This course will address the redesign of the exam, and train experienced and new AP teachers to prepare their students for the exam. Teachers are encouraged to go to this web site to read more about the new course; http://advancesinap.collegeboard.org. All AP Spanish Language and Culture teachers need to submit a syllabus directed to this exam. Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit.

We will discuss how to teach for improvement in interpretive communication, and will spend considerable time reviewing strategies for interpersonal writing and speaking, and presentational writing and speaking. Much practice in the workshop will be directed towards the teaching of cultural comparisons, and in activities to strengthen the students’ awareness of cultural diversity.

Throughout the week, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and to work together on preparing for the Course Audit. Patricia Smith is an experienced Spanish Language Consultant who will guide you throughout the week as you prepare this syllabus. Topics to be discussed during the week will include:

Course Description, Planning and Pacing Guide for Course
Standards for Foreign Language Learning
AP Spanish Language and Culture Practice Exam
Three modes of communication
Emphasis on cultures of Spanish-speaking world
Analysis of the six themes on which the course is based
Curriculum framework and learning objectives
Strategies of teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing
Cooperative learning
Becoming an AP Reader
AP Equity and Access
Differentiated instruction

Statistics

Instructor: Brendan Murphy

The objectives of this weeklong workshop are straightforward: to help our participants do a better job teaching AP Statistics and to improve their students’ scores on the AP Exam.

We will examine the College Board’s outline of topics and course philosophy, discuss the course expectations, and share strategies for success on the AP exam. Additionally, we will review and clarify important concepts in Statistics and provide guidance and answer questions about the subject matter. We will also explore pedagogy, looking at sample lessons, classroom activities, effective demos, and possibilities for projects. Finally, we’ll look at a variety of resources, including textbooks, calculators, videos, software, and other materials.

Whether you are new to AP Statistics or a veteran educator, you’ll come away with lots of valuable insights (and have fun, too)!

Dear AP Statistics Participant:

Greetings and welcome to the St. Johnsbury AP Summer Institute. If you have never been to St. Johnsbury or Vermont you’re in for a treat!! I’m looking forward to meeting and working with you this summer, and I’m sure you’ll find the experience to be some of the best professional development you’ve ever participated in. I’m a high school math teacher in Bangor, Maine and ran a mentoring program for the Maine Department of Education for new(er) AP Statistics teachers for seven years. I’m a former Table Leader/Reader for AP Statistics and have run summer institutes in AP Statistics, AP Calculus and Vertical Teams Math. I am currently on the AP Calculus Test Development Committee as well as Chair of the SAT Math Subject Test Development Committee.

We will review all of the major topics covered under the AP Statistics curriculum, the AP Exam, resources and classroom strategies. Typically we will have a mix of teachers with different levels of experience which just makes for a better week and classroom discussions. Since the AP Statistics Exam is 100% calculator active, I will use the TI-83/84 as a teaching tool during the institute. I usually assign a small amount of homework each night but want to make sure we have plenty of time for bocce and fun as well. We will review in detail the new CED (Course and Exam Description) from the College Board and discuss any curriculum changes to this course.

We will review released Multiple Choice and Free Response questions from the College Board as we discuss the various statistical concepts. If you have a textbook that you will be using feel free to bring it, if not do not worry about it. Please bring your graphing calculator if you have one, if not I usually bring a few extras which you could borrow during the week. If you have a laptop/tablet I encourage you to bring this as well. If you are newer to teaching the statistics I would encourage you to do some review work before our session as it will make your week more productive (I will email you some readings before our session starts).

The campus is beautiful, the food is excellent, and I am sure we’ll have a great week together. Do not worry if you have not taught the course before, we’ll have some fun and laugh a lot and of course do a lot of productive work during the week.

Feel free to contact me with any questions, concerns, or issues at brendankmurphy@yahoo.com. Good luck with rest of your school year, and I look forward to working with you in July. I’ll see you in Vermont this summer and thanks for selecting St. Johnsbury!

Brendan K. Murphy

AP Statistics Institute

Overview

Monday, July 22

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, July 23

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, July 24

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 25

8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

12;30 – 3:00 p.m.

Friday, July 26

8:00 a.m. – 12:00pm

Lunch will be provided each day for 30 minutes.

There will be a morning break with typical refreshments provided.

I will be available on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday afternoons and/or lunch for extra help, one on one help, and/or calculator instruction.

Course Outline

We will cover the four major content areas covered under the AP Statistics curriculum including:

  1. Exploratory Data Analysis
  2. Designing an Experiment/Survey
  3. Probability and Simulations
  4. Statistical Inference

As we discuss each topic, we will review in detail previously released AP Statistics free response and multiple choice questions and discuss what students “need to know” for the AP Exam.


AP Statistics Institute

Outline

Title: AP Statistics

Goal: To help prepare beginning teachers to AP Statistics the skills to develop and present an effective AP Statistics class. For more experienced AP teachers, this institute will help you refine and improve upon your existing statistics skills.

Course Description: Over the course of this institute we will discuss:

1.Topics included in the AP curriculum

2.Calculator usage

3.Teaching styles/strategies

4.Various textbooks/publishers

5.Available resources for AP teachers

6.How to present various statistical concepts

7.The AP exam format

8.Scoring the AP exam

Instruction Types: Presentations, group discussions, small group work, individual presentations, problem-solving sets

Assignments: Participants are expected to participate daily according to their comfort level, “homework” will be given on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday nights, with individual presentations on Thursday or Friday as applicable.

Letter of Accommodation: If you need/want me to write a letter to your superintendent, principal or department head explaining the work you did during this institute, please just leave a name and address and I will gladly do this when I get back to school in the fall.

Calculators: The TI-83 (84) graphing calculator will be used extensively during the institute, participants should bring their own calculator. If you are unable to bring a calculator, let me know and I will bring you a “loaner” calculator for the week.


AP Statistics Institute

Daily Overview

Day 1: Monday, July 22

  • Problem of the Day
  • AP Statistics Overview
  • New CB CED
  • Calculator usage
  • Textbooks/Resources
  • Graphical Analysis/Displays
  • Exploratory Data Analysis
  • Homework

Day 2: Tuesday, July 23

  • Problem of the Day
  • New CB CED
  • Standard Normal Distribution
  • Z Scores/Table A
  • LSRL
  • Designing an Experiment
  • Homework

Day 3: Wednesday, July 24

  • Problem of the Day
  • New CB CED
  • Surveys
  • Bias
  • Probability
  • Select a Free Response Question for Presentation

Day 4: Thursday, July 25

  • Problem of the Day
  • Simulations/Calculator Random Digits Table
  • Statistical Inference
  • Individual Presentations

Day 5: Friday, July 26

  • Problem of the Day
  • Individual Presentations
  • Scoring the AP Exam
  • Closing Activities
  • Evaluations

Topic Course: Library 2.0: Rethinking the School Library Media Center for 21st Century Students with Jen Stone

Instructor: Jennifer Stone

The library and the library media specialist have never been more important in today's schools and our information driven society. This workshop will focus on transforming the school library media center to meet the needs of the digital generation as well as explore ways to make your library a vital information center that is the focal point of your school and an indispensable resource for both students and teachers.

Topics that we will discuss include

  • Marketing
  • Advocacy
  • Social media
  • Information Literacy and Digital Citizenship
  • Collaboration
  • The Virtual Library
  • Apps
  • E-books
  • Technology in the library

Topic Course: Teaching with Technology with Liz Laverty

Instructor: Liz Laverty

This workshop is designed for teachers looking to use technology thoughtfully and intentionally in their classrooms. It provides participants with practical knowledge, engaging strategies, insight into new apps, and time and one-on-one assistance to design their own successful lessons. This small cohort is limited to 10 participants to maximize individual instruction. Participants should bring their own devices, and instruction will include demonstrations using a variety of platforms and devices.

US History

Instructor: Susan Pingel

This workshop is designed for both new and experienced teachers and will focus on the recently redesigned AP US History course and exam. The new curriculum framework establishes a specific set of historical thinking skills and thematic learning objectives which helps teachers organize the content starting in 1491 and ending in the present. The workshop will explore best practices for bringing together skills, themes, and content in the classroom and will provide opportunities for participants to work with peers, share ideas, lessons, and best practices. Teachers will learn how they have more freedom to develop courses that challenge their students in their schools.

Teachers will wrestle with how to teach the best US History college level survey course they can teach through addressing compelling questions, primary sources, the course syllabus, and running classroom discussions.

Advanced Placement Summer Institute

United States History

St. Johnsbury Academy, VT July 2019


Susan Pingel, Consultant

sfpmentoring@gmail.com


Welcome! I am looking forward to a worthwhile and productive week together as we explore the AP United States History curriculum and share our collective knowledge and experience.

The 2019-2020 school year features new AP resources and processes, including Fall registration and AP Classroom. This workshop gives participants an overview of the AP program in US History (APUSH), concrete information about the curriculum and exam, and practical best practices to use in the classroom. This includes insight into the creation and expansion of an APUSH program, selection of text and course materials, development of syllabi, pacing suggestions, lessons, and assessments. In addition, direct instruction on the scoring of Free-Response questions (FRQs) will occur, including short answer questions (SAQs), the document based question (DBQ), and long essay questions (LEQs). Participants will have the opportunity to explore the new AP United States History Course Exam and Description (CED), prepare and analyze data sets, deconstruct the writing process and other experiences to improve the quality of their APUSH classroom and foster student success. Be ready for an amazing week in Vermont!

Please be ready to share ideas, ask questions, think broadly about your educational practice, work hard and enjoy your experience. The more you put in, the more you will gain.

To facilitate the above, participants should:

  • complete the short survey ASAP after registration: https://forms.gle/zXv3q45ML2XRYfen8
  • have access to their current APUSH textbooks, along with any primary and secondary sources used in the classroom;
  • have access to your school calendar for the upcoming year;
  • be prepared to demonstrate and share one favorite lesson/best practice, if AP is new to you, no worries, still looking for your favorite lesson/best practice;
  • have access to, via print or electronically, three to five primary or secondary sources you intend to use next year; and
  • bring your computer as most supplemental materials will be distributed electronically.


The following pages provide a basic overview of the week’s agenda.

Look forward to meeting you and working with you this summer!

Susan


APSI United States History Agenda*

(*Please note, agenda subject/placement subject to change based on needs of participants.)

APSI United States History Key Takeaways:

Understanding the Course

  • AP courses focus on building conceptual understanding and developing transferable skills.
  • AP history courses focus on building conceptual understandings through the teaching of linked learning objectives and historical development statements, all contextualized around course specific themes.
  • The course framework defines the scope of the course and specifies what students must know and be able to do on the AP Exam.
  • Knowing what happened in the past is only the first step; students must be able to make meaning out of historical knowledge by organizing and explaining it.

Planning the Course

  • Helping students develop mastery of the course skills requires careful planning to sequence skills in a developmentally appropriate way so that students master prerequisite skills before being asked to complete more complex tasks.
  • Sources and examples used in class should be relevant and accessible to your students.
  • Teachers should use multiple instructional strategies throughout the course in order to reach and challenge all learners.

Teaching the Course

  • Students need multiple opportunities to practice the skills and processes in order to develop mastery over time. Certain strategies can help students explicitly practice those skills and processes.
  • Sequencing, pacing, and scaffolding are essential for building students’ understanding and ability to transfer and apply knowledge with the thinking skills and reasoning processes.
  • Many of the themes and unit topics connect with each other. Students need to be taught what these connections are and how to use these connections in the development of their claims/arguments.

Assessing Student Progress and Understanding

  • Assessments, instruction, and resources should be aligned to learning goals and matched to performance expectations.
  • Students need to demonstrate understanding of both the content of the course and the AP historical thinking skills and reasoning processes.
  • Assessments and meaningful feedback enable both teachers and students to know what students know and understand.

Becoming a Member of the AP Community

  • Professional networking can provide teachers with opportunities to discuss teaching strategies, share resources, and connect with each other.
  • At the start of the year, teachers and students will complete a short digital activation process that will allow them immediate access to classroom resources.


DAY 1:

Focus: Course Overview, Equity and Access, Understanding the Structure of the Curriculum Framework and the Exam (MC), Using the New Course Exam and Description, Selecting Resources

Agenda Items:

  • Introductions and goals
  • AP Central
  • AP Equity and Access
  • Building an AP Program: Recruiting Students
  • Fall Registration
  • Understanding the Structure of the Curriculum Framework:
    • AP Historical Thinking Skills and Reasoning Processes
    • Themes
    • Course Content
  • Selecting Resources for your course, including textbooks
  • AP Resources and Supports
  • Curricular Requirements and Syllabus Development
  • Pacing your course
  • Introduction to the AP U. S. History Examination – focus on multiple choice
  • Homework and college credit

DAY 2:

Focus: AP Historical Thinking Skills and Reasoning Processes, Analyzing Primary and Secondary Sources, Making Connections, Using AP Resources and Support, Understanding the Exam (Short Answer Questions)

Agenda:

  • AP Historical Thinking Skills & Reasoning Processes and the AP U.S. History Course
  • Analyzing Primary Sources
  • Analyzing Secondary Sources
  • Contextualization
  • Making Connections: Comparison
  • Making Connections: Chronological Reasoning - Causation, CCOT
  • Sequencing the APUSH Course
  • AP Classroom: Personal Progress Checks and the AP Question Bank
  • Strategies for Teaching AP U.S. History
  • Focus on AP U.S. Exam: Short Answer - scoring student samples, writing SAQs
  • Reading and Writing in the APUSH Classroom
  • Homework - Continue working on syllabus and a lesson to share; login to Academic Merit and review SAQ scoring

DAY 3:

Focus: AP Classroom, AP Historical Thinking Skills and Reasoning Processes, Argument Development, Understanding the Exam (DBQ)

Agenda:

  • AP Historical Thinking Skills and Reasoning Processes and the AP U.S. History Course
    • Primary Sources: Content and Sourcing
    • Secondary Sources: Interpretation
    • Analyzing Historical Evidence
    • Argument Development
  • Focus on AP U.S. Exam: Document Based Question
  • Exploring Student Samples and Scoring of the DBQ
  • Creating Document Sets
  • Strategies for Teaching AP U.S. History
  • Homework - Continue working on syllabus and a lesson to share; login to Academic Merit and review DBQ & LEQ scoring

DAY 4:

Focus: AP Historical Thinking Skills and Reasoning Processes, Argument Development, Sequencing the Course, Understanding the Exam (LEQ), Teaching the AP U.S. History Course, AP Community, Best Practices

Agenda:

  • Historical Thinking Skills & Reasoning Skills and the AP U.S. History Course
  • Creating and Supporting an Argument: Argumentation
  • Assessment: Formative and Summative to guide instruction
  • Using the Instructional Planning Report
  • Focus on AP U.S. Exam: Long Essay Question
  • Exploring Student Samples and Scoring of the LEQ
  • Becoming a member of the AP Community
  • Best Practices

DAY 5:

Focus: Best Practices, Review, Resources

Agenda:

  • Reviewing for the APUSH exam
  • Resources to support teaching APUSH
  • After the test
  • Best Practices
  • Questions
  • Evaluations
  • Homework: Have a wonderful and successful academic year!

World History

Instructor: Deborah Johnston

The institute will provide participants with an overview of the course including content, skills, and AP strategies. Most of the time will be spent on the 2017 assessment revisions, as well as on work to develop materials on teaching the historical thinking skills using the 2018 samples. Deb believes that AP world history is best taught through interactive strategies so participants will be actively engaged in doing world history during the institute through discussions, simulations and group activities, similar to what teachers might choose to do in their own classrooms. She will share world history content and resources, as well as model lesson plans. Working with AP sample essays, the session will discuss effective teaching techniques for the new AP essay writing and for AP test-taking. Deb will specifically work to ensure that participants(and their students) feel confident with the stimulus based multiple choice questions as well as the use of skills in the free response portion of the test. In addition, Deb will provide tips on how to add new case studies that address less well known topics and challenging subject matter from the required curriculum frameworks to AP World history courses in time efficient ways.